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Gary E Moore
Last week we looked at Henry C. Groseclose, the man. This week we will learn about the museum dedicated to him and the FFA. The Groseclose FFA Museum is located in Ceres, Virginia. This small community had an elementary and high school until 1962 at which time the high school was moved to the town of Bland. In 1991 the elementary school was closed…
in Friday Footnotes
Gary E Moore
Who is Henry C. Groseclose? (9/13/2019)Posted on September 12, 2019 by gmoore@ncsu.edu After I wrote the Friday Footnote a month or so ago about the passing of Mrs. Henry C. Groseclose I realized that the profession now probably knew more about Marie Groseclose than they did about Henry Groseclose, the Father of the FFA. Basically, we teach our…
in Friday Footnotes
Gary E Moore
The Director of the USDA Office of Experiment Stations, A. C. True, was able to use the Hatch Act of 1887 to established agricultural education in public schools. Our guest columnist for this week, Dr. Jim Connors from the University of Idaho, will tell us more about this unsung hero of agricultural education.   Alfred C. True Agricultural…
in Friday Footnotes
Gary E Moore
At this time of the year many agriculture teachers across the country are teaching something that goes like this:   “The Smith-Hughes Act of 1917 started the teaching of agriculture in the public schools.”   The problem is -- this is not true. According to a report from the Commissioner of Education for 1914-1915, two years before the passage of…
in Friday Footnotes
Gary E Moore
It is time for another Joe Scatterscrew story. I introduced Joe with the 12/14/2018 footnote. In case you don't remember that, here is the introductory paragraph.   Joe Scatterscrew is a fictitious agriculture teacher. He was created in the 1950s by the Head of Agricultural Education at Texas A&M University,  E. V. Walton. Professor Walton wrote…
in Friday Footnotes
Gary E Moore
What happened to all the vegetables that came from the Victory Gardens that we discussed last week? Some of the produce was eaten, sold, or canned at home. However, some of it was processed at a school-community cannery operated by the school’s agricultural department. It is hard to believe, but near the end of World War II there were 3,142…
in Friday Footnotes
Gary E Moore
During World War II FFA and 4-H members grew Victory Gardens. In this Friday Footnote, we will learn more about Victory Gardens. We have a team of North Carolina State students and faculty as guest authors for this Footnote. Emma Cannon (grad student), Victoria Brewer (Chatham County 4-H agent), Dr. Barbara Kirby (Professor) and Dr. Joy Morgan…
in Friday Footnotes
Gary E Moore
A few weeks ago the Friday Footnote (7/12/2019) focused on how the GI Bill (officially the Servicemen’s Readjustment Act) enabled World War II veterans to enroll in the Institutional On-Farm Training Program. This was a program where returning veterans took vocational agriculture classes at their local high schools, typically at night. Nearly…
in Friday Footnotes
Gary E Moore
Would you be surprised to learn that the wife of Henry Groseclose, the Father of the FFA, passed away three months ago? I certainly was. When you realize that the FFA started in 1928 it is somewhat incongruous that his wife died in 2019, some 91 years after the establishment of the FFA. I wanted to publish this Footnote as soon as I learned of the…
in Friday Footnotes
Gary E Moore
For the past month or so the Friday Footnote has focused on FFA and World War II. We have at least three more Footnotes on that topic to publish, but I have decided to deviate from the publishing schedule and “Rise to a Point of Personal Privilege” and share a recent personal story that you might find to be of interest. It is about the FFA Officer…
in Friday Footnotes
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