Alan Green

Episode 5 - A CASE Update / Transcript

Blog Post created by Alan Green on Oct 13, 2020

Alan Green:

Welcome to Connect, a podcast by the National Association of Agricultural Educators. No matter how long you've been in the classroom, we as agricultural educators know the power that connections play in bettering ourselves as educators and strengthening our professional. Connect is a podcast by the National Association of Agricultural Educators, and works to educate listeners about NAAE resources, inform them of new and innovative practices and Connect current and future agricultural educators and supporters. I'm your host, Alan Green, we are excited that you're here. So let's get started.

 

Alan Green:

Hey there and welcome back to another episode of Connect, a podcast by the National Association of Agricultural Educators. We're excited to keep the conversation about CASE going in today's episode, if you're new here and you've never heard of it, CASE for the Curriculum for Agricultural Science Education, and it's a project managed by NAAE with the goal of implementing a national curriculum that's both rigorous and relevant for secondary agricultural education. If you're interested in learning more about CASE itself, we encourage you to check out the second episode of our podcast, the CASE on CASE where we interview two CASE master teachers and learn more about how it's changed both their professional and personal life. And we'll include a link to it in the show notes for this episode. One of the most important things to know about CASE is that it's not a box curriculum set, CASE isn't in the market of selling curriculum. Instead, it conducts high quality professional development, which up until this year has been mostly offered in person in institutes during the summer months across the country.

 

Alan Green:

So in the past in order for teachers to use CASE curriculum, they first must attend a CASE institute for a specific course. However, like most things, COVID-19 has significantly changed CASE programming and how it provides professional development to teachers, which is why we're excited to be chatting with to NAAE staff members. And more specifically two CASE team members, Jesse Lumpkins and Sara Cobb, to provide a few updates related to CASE programming and additional projects in the works as they continue to serve agricultural educators. Jessie and Sara, thank you so much for joining us today.

 

Jessie Lumpkins:

Thanks. Glad to be here.

 

Alan Green:

We are so excited to be talking with you two, I don't know if you know this, but you two are the first actual NAAE staff members that have been on the podcast. We've had teachers, NAAE board members, sponsors, outside experts, but never have had staff members. So I guess congratulations on that honor. Jesse and Sara, would you like to kick off the conversation and just talk a little bit about who you are and what your role with NAAE and CASE are?

 

Sara Cobb:

Sure. Thanks for having us on today, Alan. My name is Sara Cobb and I joined the CASE team in 2015, originally as the online learning coordinator and since then my role has evolved several times and I'm currently in the capacity as the certification and digital learning coordinator. And as a component of that I work with the development of our professional development program, and then also our student credentialing program.

 

Alan Green:

Wonderful.

 

Jessie Lumpkins:

I'm Jessie Lumpkins, I am from Nashville, Tennessee. And for about 10 years, I taught agriculture, I was in the classroom, I had a lot of diverse populations and different students and it was really fun to champion that. And I use CASE since at least 2015, I was able to go every summer and be a lead teacher, which was some of my favorite experiences every year. And in March, I was able to transition into being the program manager for CASE with NAAE which means on a daily basis I get to help teachers and connect them to the curriculum that they need for our new website that I know we're going to talk about. And provide also things like scholarships and grants to be able to make CASE and curriculum access and getting all the equipment just a little bit easier for our teachers. So I enjoy being on the frontlines of that and helping folks with the things they need and also managing our social media so we can have a bigger and better presence always online.

 

Alan Green:

And I'm really excited to be here. Again, I'm the host of the podcast, Alan Green, I'm excited to be here as a former teacher who used CASE and got to go to a CASE institute and continue those conversations about how CASE is really adapting their programming to meet agricultural educators across the country, especially this year and all the challenges that COVID-19 has brought. So I mentioned earlier that COVID-19 has been like any other and obviously CASE is in the business of providing in person professional development. That's where the majority of the PD hours come from in the past. The first question that I have for you two is, obviously that COVID-19 has caused a lot of issues and a lot of challenges, how has CASE responded to COVID-19 and what has really changed maybe in the last six months or so as a result of it?

 

Jessie Lumpkins:

So we know that and you did a great job of explaining that and so did Carol and Karen in the last podcast. CASE is not just curriculum that we send to folks, it's really the professional development that prepares you to develop this year long or to utilize and truly understand so that we can better deliver it to students, the curriculum. So, that in person training is vital. And Alan, you've been to one and you know how you can probably put yourself in the position of seeing that curriculum and having never been trained that it would have been pretty difficult. So we know that we have to adapt to that and I'm sure we'll chat about some of the things that the next year is going to look like. So I was impressed when I came on the team in March and noticed very quickly that Carl Arcuri, now our assistant director, realized the need for some immediate PD, that it was going to take some time to develop a lot of the things that we're going to need in 2021 and beyond.

 

Jessie Lumpkins:

But I love being able to collaborate with him on CASE ASA, which is our animal science course, the very first immersive PD that we were able to provide. So it's still ongoing right now and what immersive really means is that although the PD is occurring simultaneously, you know our teachers are getting trained a week or two, three weeks or so, a month before they're going to provide that. So although it's not in person traditionally, that eight to five for about two weeks that we traditionally know, teachers are still being able to utilize the ASA curriculum as they're being trained for it this semester. The coolest thing to me about that is our ability to since we are saving money on not having any in person items, lodging or meals, things like that. And of course, we miss that, we can save that money and provide a different perk to these teachers. And that's sending them a lot of different materials that they need for those courses.

 

Jessie Lumpkins:

So the things that if you are CASE certified and you're aware of that, you get materials from Vernier and Lab-Aids, we were able to send those teachers not only the materials that they need to conduct those labs and learn how to do the APPs at first, but also equipment and supplies that they can then use for their students. And so understanding that we had planned a final in person event, we are really looking forward to that, probably not going to happen at this point. So we know that we will have some more money that we're able to spend on those teachers. And although we are lacking that in person community, they have a two cohorts, one kind of East Coast and then a West Coast, so that they are collaborating a little bit in real time.

 

Jessie Lumpkins:

They meet on Saturday, it's to be able to go through their curriculum, we have some great lead teachers that are doing this for the first time virtually and so they're also learning a lot so that in 2021, when we possibly have to do a lot more PD online and not face to face, that we will know better how teachers can truly learn best on a type of Zoom PD, because I think at this point we've been on Zoom long enough to see that although we are talking with our friends, they're the same people when we are in person that it does provide some challenges. So I've really been excited to see what that ASA group is doing and I'll be very interested to see too at the end, how that experience was different from in person and what we can learn from that for the future.

 

Sara Cobb:

I think one of the most interesting and positive things of the COVID impact on CASE has been how it has pushed our staff to be innovative and really think outside of our traditional program offerings. And in March, when everything started to shut down, we were already shifting our in person elite elevation conference virtual and so we had started prior to that when we saw that the shutdown was happening, shifting to how are we going to make a connection and build a relationship with our lead teachers and our affiliate professors who are attending elite elevation through a screen. And because typically, that conference is something where we spend two to three days together and we really build our CASE family and our CASE relationships, which is a huge part of what makes CASE so successful. So to be able to shift to a digital world and maintain that connection was really important to us.

 

Sara Cobb:

And just going through that process really helped us to open our eyes into, "Okay, so then how does this need to expand into our more traditional professional development offerings?" And so we started with briefcases, which are our one day in person training typically and shifted that to a virtual training and that really was a challenging project for our staff to be able to take a four hour in person training and turn it into a transformative virtual training. And so we really had to expand our minds on the tech, expand our minds on what does good digital pedagogy look like? And that went through several iterations. And after we got that figured out, that's when we started to transition into, "Okay, now, how do we tackle CASE institutes?" And that's where Carl and Jesse put together this ASA immersive plan, which we're running this fall that seems to be doing really well and really successful. We are currently working on putting together a schedule for in person professional development for next summer.

 

Sara Cobb:

However, we're also in the back of our minds, we're thinking, "Okay, what's the contingency plan?" We don't know what anything is going to look like. So, just knowing that we want to continue to be innovative and continue to push those boundaries and also, it's good that we've branched out into this virtual world because we know that there is a group of Ag teachers who can't commit to attending in person. They have so many other things going on, but they might be interested in CASE, might want to get certified, but the schedule that we offer... Our traditional schedule doesn't work for them. So we're looking at this as these are changes that will be implemented for the long term, they're not changes that we're looking to just do through the pandemic. So we're trying to have that end goal in mind of what's our long term plan? How do we transition this into something that is still transformative PD, but helps us grow the profession as well.

 

Alan Green:

Which I was just going to say, I commend the entire CASE team, because they think to move from such a model that... CASE has provided those in person professional development experiences for several years to be able to have something like this come up and to be able to pivot in such a phenomenal way and reach teachers where they are, I think is just fantastic. I didn't start with NAAE until the beginning of August, and so I was experiencing more of it from a teacher perspective. And Sara, like you said, I think that this will be a really great opportunity moving into 2021, about how CASE changes its programming a little bit because the CASE institutes they're a big time commitment. That was something when I went to mine, it was the summer that my wife and I were getting married, we had a lot on our plate, it was most definitely worth it. I absolutely loved the experience. But I think it's such a great opportunity to meet teachers where they are and to fit into their schedule.

 

Alan Green:

Maybe it's a little bit premature to ask this question, but what is 2021 looking like, as far as the CASE institutes? Sara, you mentioned that you're looking at a schedule for in person, but is there plans to offer more of the immersive professional development experiences in other courses as well?

 

Sara Cobb:

Yeah, so we are in the process right now of collecting our host applications, what we typically do each fall. And so we will announce our in person CASE institute and briefcase offerings for summer 2021, right around the same time as National FFA Convention, just like we do every year. However, that's kind of our, everything's going to be fine.

Alan Green:

Wishful thinking.

 

Sara Cobb:

That's where we want to be. In a perfect world, we want to be able to say that if you want to become Food Science and Safety certified next summer, that we're going to have institutes for you to attend in person. But along with that, we are also scheduling some... Where we anticipate scheduling some virtual or immersive options as well, because we want those options to be a part of our programming forever, not just something that we're doing this past fall. So one thing that we're trying to figure out as we go through all of that is, so right now we have ASA prepared to do that with, we have the business course agricultural business foundations has a virtual offering as well. So our big project for this winter is really taking the rest of our foundations courses, which would be plant science, AFNR, Ag, food and natural resources, APT, Ag power and tech, and then natural resources, NRE and moving them into some type of virtual option.

 

Sara Cobb:

Because while we're also planning for, this is the best scenario and that's what we want to happen being in person, we're also planning for what's the worst scenario? And so for us, the worst scenario would be last summer to repeat itself, where in person was not an option. And so we're trying to come up with a plan for that. We really would like to be able to say we're still offering professional development for every single course. And so that's our goal, is to still be able to offer professional development for every single course to get teachers certified and prepared to be effective in the classroom with that course material. So we'll see how that goes. We're still in the early planning stages of all of that,

 

Alan Green:

Into like... That's a difficult decision, it's a difficult situation to navigate. It's not, "Oh, next week we'll crank something else." So, one question that I was going to ask, we're in a world where the presence of technology, especially in the classroom is growing every single day, whether teachers are in person and using technology to supplement or to facilitate their learning or virtually, what is CASE doing to help teachers implement technology into their classrooms and into their curriculum?

 

Sara Cobb:

Yeah. So we are... I don't know if you've heard or not about the Thrive Conference. And so the Thrive Conference is a new conference that CASE is offering this year. And we've actually internally discussed doing an educational technology based conference for several years. But it just hadn't... The timing wasn't right in all the conversations that we had. And with COVID, the timing is now and so we spent some time this past spring and summer, really narrowing down if we were to do an ed tech conference, what would we want to focus on. And so we've decided that we are going to go ahead and we're going to offer Thrive and we currently have a call out for presenters because we have seen through our contacts, friends that we know, social media, just across the Ag community, there's so many teachers who are doing really innovative, exciting, creative solutions to how to instruct CTE curriculum in a virtual classroom.

 

Sara Cobb:

And we want to highlight that, we want to be able to share those tips and techniques and resources with teachers across the country. So, Thrive is not going to be limited to CASE teachers, whether you're a CASE teacher, whether you're CASE certified or not, you're welcome to submit a workshop proposal for us. And you're also welcome to attend, we just really want it to be a think tank of all things Ag ed and how we can use educational technology to grow our students.

 

Jessie Lumpkins:

And really adapt to what the rest of this semester, the spring semester. And really because I think... And teachers will be able to just from the feedback we get from teachers, it seems like even when hybrid is over, virtual might be over and we're all in person. I think this shows that education has been changed forever and the landscape is going to be completely different even when things go back to some type of normal. And so CASE wants to adapt to that too. So for those who might have ever had CASE online, which we know is a supplement to CASE curriculum, because we do have a new website and some folks might consider that to be CASE online as well. But CASE online previously, you were able to purchase flipped videos and those are available now for free on YouTube. So there're some great playlists on YouTube for some of those, especially if maybe you're not able to see your students in person or when you provide some of that instruction, if they're absent or they weren't able to get on Zoom, that might help as well.

 

Jessie Lumpkins:

We have teachers who are sending some recorded labs, because obviously, if you have students at home and it's very difficult to send a lot of lab materials. I have seen some teachers that have worked together to put boxes and I think that's amazing. But we just hope to be able to also cultivate some of the great things that teachers are doing and share those on things like our YouTube and our Facebook as well.

 

Alan Green:

And I was going to say to that, last spring when I was teaching intro to AFNR using CASE, we had to switch to a virtual format. The online flip videos were so valuable in my classroom because it was one last thing number one that I had to worry about, but two, it was making sure that students were engaging with material and also getting to watch that video and hearing that voice I think is extremely valuable as well. Jessie, you mentioned it a little bit, but I'm going to lead into our next question. CASE has an updated website, it is beautiful, tell me more about it. Tell me more about what it means for CASE certified teachers and someone who might be visiting the website.

 

Jessie Lumpkins:

Yeah, so our website, we're really excited about it. It was in the works before I was able to come on the team, but it's something that I've been able to help manage. And I've really enjoyed being able to... Not to say that any old version of any site is bad, but when you reevaluate things like a website you are able to see maybe gaps in communication. So overall, one thing that my goal and our team's goal is to just provide more of a learning page for anything that people need when it comes to CASE, so that you know if it's something like, you have a student teacher now and they need to have curriculum access or you're planning for next year and even though the institute schedule isn't out, you would like to know in general how much does one of the courses cost to be certified and et cetera. So, in addition to just having more of a FAQ section, so that it's a comprehensive area, two of the biggest things are now online access to curriculum and the CASE store.

 

Jessie Lumpkins:

So previously, for those people who may not have ever been certified or heard or had a friend that's certified, now back in the day, my very first certification in I think 2015, you would get a CD with a curriculum and you'd load it onto your laptop, computer, whatever and it would have a little icon, you'd click on that and then it would take you to an HTML navigated version of the curriculum. A few years later, we were able to do download codes, so you would put a download code and you'd get your curriculum. And there are plenty of teachers we know that still utilize those. And that's great, because for those who don't know, once you're CASE certified, regardless of which school you moved to, you could move from Maine to Hawaii and whatever school that you went to or left and then went to, that intellectual property moves with you. So, that's fine.

 

Jessie Lumpkins:

However, most CASE teachers realize that there's a rotation of when we update and revise our curriculum, because of course, we always want to be relevant with the industry making sure that we're preparing our students for the careers that they're actually going to face. So it's important for us to keep that curriculum updated. Now, one of the best things about having our curriculum located online now, where you don't have to download it to your local device, is that if we found something that needed to be changed in the curriculum tomorrow, maybe a broken link that was exterior to CASE or we just wanted to update something regarding equipment or materials, that we'd be able to push that out and anybody who logged in after that would be able to see it.

 

Jessie Lumpkins:

So going back in case there are folks who haven't been able to access this yet, first of all, tell you if you have ever been CASE certified and or you've ever paid NAAE dues, which we know that you don't have to be an NAAE member to become CASE certified, but we have many, many folks who cross over both of those areas, that you probably already have an account. But we do have a lot of folks, since we launched this just back in July, that you may not have utilized your account before, so you wouldn't know. So, I would suggest and I just put this out there every time I talk with folks, that if you're logging in for the first time, try to use some email addresses that you might have used in the past, especially those... If you were a student, NAAE member, or if you had pre service certification, you definitely already have an account. It could be under the school email that you had, your university or college email.

 

Jessie Lumpkins:

Now, of course, there could be if you move schools an email account connected to yours that is not accessible anymore and that's completely fine, folks can email me and my information is on our website, caseforlearning.org, under about and contact. And I can just manually change that for folks. And I know that sounds a little bit like boring logistics, but I do think that might help anybody who might be struggling because that's just the growing pains that we faced in the first few months of implementation. And if there's a way that we can get folks access just a little bit quicker, then I'd love to do that as well. Also, if you ever reset your password, so I do think this is important for everybody, whatever email that you use as your username on caseforlearning.org, is the email that when we want to contact you, we're going to use. So we don't mind if it's your school email or personal, whatever works for you is fine. Just keep in mind that if you ever change that, that's your contact information for us.

 

Jessie Lumpkins:

So if you ever need to do that and reset a password and you don't get that email, sometimes they go to spam, that's just one thing I like to remind folks. Now, once you are finally logged in to my CASE, which is what we call that area once you have all your personal CASE information, we also call that the dashboard, you're going to be able to access the certificate that you may need for PD related to whenever you took that course. So for some reason you have to go back maybe your license is getting renewed and you need to show that you had many, many upwards of 50, 60, 70 when it comes to these amazing institutes. You need to be able to show that, your certificate is on your dashboard. But of course, the link to your curriculum accesses as well. So when you get to that area, you'll see that we're able to... This is something just as a logistics person really interesting and exciting to me. For each specific course there's a little area on your dashboard related just to that course.

 

Jessie Lumpkins:

So, CASE teachers know and for those who may not, CASE curriculum is copywritten. Once you have it, of course it's your property, but folks would need to be able to become certified to be able to have that information. So we face the struggle of wanting to be able to update all of our folks on the big things and the small things, but we of course have to restrict it to those groups. So if you haven't noticed and you go on your dashboard, if there's something great just related to like right now on NRE, there was a great TED Talk related to wildfires. And Molly Bloom, who's on our staff in his curriculum, noticed that it would relate really well to lesson 7.2, related to timber in NRE. So we were able to put a link to that on the dashboard and we hope to just be able to find more of those little resources to be able to connect teachers to that. When you actually click on the link to take you to the curriculum, you'll also see that there are many different ways to navigate that. So we talked about it being online.

 

Jessie Lumpkins:

The one challenge that that could present to some teachers if you have connectivity issues or issues related to Wi-Fi. And we know that a lot of students have this issue as well. If there is a concern related to accessing your curriculum online, once you get into that, you're going to see what we've been calling it on the left hand navigation panel in your curriculum, there are also ways to download the entire bundle, which you could do and then it goes back to looking like what the curriculum traditionally looked like. You can also download the entire student workbook for any course. I think there's one that might be ARD, that just isn't a workbook related to the course, but those are all in PDF, it's all one big PDF. So if you're in person or you want to provide PDFs for your students virtually, that is already there as well. Something to keep in mind about those two options is, once you've downloaded them, they're static. So those updates we talked about a few minutes ago, if we ever pushed those out, you would have to download those things again to see if that updated version.

 

Jessie Lumpkins:

But as you navigate it, you'll see that it is very cleanly put together. It's under what we call accordion, so it [inaudible 00:26:56] really well and you can access things really quickly. And we also know teachers need Word doc versions of things. So in case you haven't heard, there are two ways that you can do the actual editable version. I know that when I was in the classroom, I needed to be able to edit some versions and I know now of course a lot of teachers want to be able to put them on different learning management systems. So, for anybody who is ever going to access this and wants to be able to navigate that and you haven't found it yet, if you go to the unit that you're looking at and then you click on lesson, when that pops up, there are a bunch of accordion tabs, as we call them. And when you click on instructional resources, you'll be led to the Word document versions if you need to access that.

 

Jessie Lumpkins:

And for AFNR, now we're recording this in late September. For AFNR we do have them all now converted to Google. John Bergen was able to join the team to do that. Yes, it's great. So we're able to once a week, anybody who was requested for that link, now that link is only available to folks who are logged in and have AFNR certifications. We're able to share that entire Google folder. And that's not just the APPs converted to Google so that folks can put it into Google Classroom, but it's also all of the checks for understanding as Google forums so that they can be actual assessments. Yeah. So, in the future, we definitely want to adapt that to other courses, we know that that's been a request too.

 

Jessie Lumpkins:

But as far as curriculum access, if there is something that you need, it's all still there, it's just been a possibly migrated a little bit and it just has a facelift, but our hope for providing this online is that you don't have to worry anymore about every summer when your computer gets re-imaged. Or if for some reason you're at home or at school or vice versa and the device that you had it downloaded to isn't there. Essentially, as long as you know your username and your password, you're going to be able to log in from any browser anywhere, any computer and be able to have access to that.

 

Alan Green:

Awesome. Well, I think that's just another great example of how CASE is meeting teachers where they are and continuing to provide them with the resources in the forms that they need so that teachers can spend less time worrying about those types of things and more time on their students. Jessie, you mentioned a little bit about the CASE store. Will you talk a little bit about what that is and the value of that to Ag teachers?

 

Jessie Lumpkins:

For sure. So, I'm thinking back to my early teaching experiences and I always loved debriefing and chatting, not just about the APPs and the curriculum, but also, I know that when I got certified and anytime I take on something big like getting CASE certified, because it's a big deal. You start to have all these other questions, not just about the curriculum, but how am I going to do this? How am I going to organize everything? How will I buy everything? So we understand that when we're introducing 180 days worth of curriculum to teachers that there is going to be a large list of materials and equipment and that that could possibly be overwhelming. So What we used to call them. And so if you're an OG CASE person, you know this, we used to call them purchasing manuals. And you'd go to our old website and download these Excel files that would say, "If you're ASP certified, here's everything you need from Vernier, here's everything you need from Lab-Aids."

 

Jessie Lumpkins:

Now, that's still available, but we think that it's actually in a more easy to use format that we're going to be able to update continually like we talked about with curriculum. And that's what we're calling the CASE store. So it's important to note that we don't actually have any physical inventory that we keep, we're not doing any actual shipping or anything, but we do have the CASE store, essentially as a liaison between the teacher and the vendors that they're going to need. It's set up in a way that will automatically update prices from those vendors. What we notice and the curriculum team shared this with me, every year, it seemed like things like possibly microscopes, they'd go up by maybe $1. So every year we'd have to change that list and you could be possibly operating from an outdated list. So connecting directly to the vendors on our website means that when you're looking at a price list, you're looking at what the price is today and you don't have to worry about that. It also has every detail about that item that you can imagine.

 

Jessie Lumpkins:

I know I worked for some very particular and detailed bookkeepers and you know from time to time that you need very specific information. So you're able to get that. But not only does it provided that, just so you know the items and you can find what you need, it also suggests the quantity that you need. Now keep in mind, we operate assuming that there's a 20 person class, so if you have less or more, that quantity recommended, obviously may need to be amended for yourself and you can make that determination. That's just for your help. But once you're on the website, if you haven't gotten to that part before in our CASE store, for instance, I'm looking right now at what I would need for the textbook vendor ATP. So in addition to the quantity that we recommend for each item, for each vendor, for each course, every page is set up so that when you input the quantity that you need, it populates the total cost, the running total.

 

Jessie Lumpkins:

So for somebody like me who's not great at math, but obviously, I needed to be able to do this, I would have loved to be able. It's essentially like a great spreadsheet that totals that for you. Now, one thing that you may need to be aware of is, as you click on the store and you're accessing different courses, we know that there are vendors who specifically will send you exactly what you need, like a specific microscope. But there are also tabs that lists things like local materials. For instance, I know that the food science and safety course requires a lot of consumable materials that obviously you just can't really buy, you would need to maybe just go to your local grocery store. Now, even though there's no way to buy that on our site and place that order on our site, there is still that list and it does have what you need, the recommended amount and the quantity needed.

 

Jessie Lumpkins:

And instead of hitting submit that order, you can hit the button that says print product listing, so you have a comprehensive list of everything you need, not only the quantity that we recommended, but the quantity that you suggested that you needed. So, essentially, the visit to our store should reduce complications when it comes to materials and equipment and make it easy for you to be able to place that order or if you have somebody else that does purchasing for you. I know sometimes there's CTE secretaries or folks that can do that. As long as they set up themselves with an account, which they don't have to be certified, they can go in and place those orders as well. And the last benefit of doing it that way other than obviously, having a lot of updated information regarding prices and whatnot, is that many of our vendors supply CASE with or CASE teachers with discounts.

 

Jessie Lumpkins:

And to be able to take advantage of those discounts, you have to go through us just so that those vendors know and we know that you are CASE certified. And so if you've been placing any orders just on your own, you at least might want to check out our store to see and be able to take advantage of some of those discounts.

 

Alan Green:

That all sounds fantastic. And I think the spreadsheet where it totals your amount as you're going I think is just wonderful, I think especially for a teacher to who maybe is working within a certain budget or they receive some type of grant and they're trying to stay at a certain amount. I think that that's such a great addition to that website as well. So, Jessie, thanks for sharing that.

 

Jessie Lumpkins:

Exactly.

 

Alan Green:

So, we're in a world right now where we're teachers across the school, not just in agricultural education, are I really trying to figure out how they're going to take their curriculum and adapt it to an online format or maybe they're in person and they're trying to figure out how they're going to do certain labs or certain activities while keeping social distancing in mind. What would you say to maybe a CASE certified teacher who's in the middle of that? Maybe they're completely online trying to figure out how to adapt their curriculum or their in person with those social distancing requirements. What would you recommend for them and how would you guide them through that process?

 

Jessie Lumpkins:

So, a few things come to mind and I'm sure Sara, because she has different strikes, she sees things from different ways. And so that's what makes working on a team so fun. One thing that keeps coming to mind when I see questions pop up. So the first thing I would suggest is, if you're CASE certified and you are active on Facebook or you'd like to be, there's a CASE teacher meetup group. Now, it does require that you're certified just in case we share things that are pretty specific to an APP, we obviously can't put that out to everybody. But I see a lot of teachers asking great questions about how to adapt certain APPs to online learning. And as much as I love AFNR and the folks on the team love the things that we are certified in and obviously, some of the team wrote everything. Once you're in the classroom and you're the one doing that adaptation, those teachers, you all are becoming the experts and you're really going to be able to inform the team and CASE staff on how to move forward with that.

 

Jessie Lumpkins:

So, I would definitely say check out that teacher meetup group and see if what you're wondering has been posted already, especially because we see that folks start school in waves. So there could be somebody that's gone to that APP and adapted already, because they possibly started school three weeks before you and you might be able to collaborate on that. When it comes to those specific APPs, there could be discussions on each one of those depending on the course. And that's where I think those can be facilitated. But overall, something that was said to me when I was being a lead teacher really stuck with me and Sara, might have thoughts on this too when she was getting certified and implementing CASE. But I remember lead teaching in Minnesota, so shout out to NAMI, Minnesota friends from that year in 2017, loved it, lived in a dairy firm for a week and a half. It was amazing and we had Cow TV, so we were able to see these amazing calves be... It was very distracting and we're able to overlook.

 

Jessie Lumpkins:

So if you've been there of the new sweetened dairy, you can see basically the entire operation from this classroom upstairs. And so I had to sometimes put up posters just so we wouldn't be watching all these amazing cows be born throughout the day. But I remember in Minnesota, there was a question specifically about some type of data that was being collected. And as a lead teacher and especially somebody when it comes to numbers, I always would feel like I'd mess up. So I got really in depth on why that piece of data might have been wrong and what we can do in the future if it's wrong again. And my CASE mentor at the time that came to evaluate and just make sure I was okay, it was Mike Retallick. It's probably Dr. Retallick. Right, Sara?

 

Sara Cobb:

Yeah, Dr. Retallick.

 

Jessie Lumpkins:

So, Dr. Retallick gave me great feedback that stuck with me since then. And he said, "I know that you want to make this good for the teachers and I promise this translates to teachers relating to students." But what he said was, "That data at every school that all these teachers are about to go back to could end up being incorrect for any number of reasons. Your equipment might not be calibrated properly, you just could have used the equipment incorrectly or the students might. Whatever the case may be, you might not have the correct materials and you have to make do. But remember that it's more about the process." So even if you end up having data that doesn't come out correctly, which I think any teacher listening CASE or not, you've probably done an experiment or lab before and it didn't come out the way you wanted. But that is also an opportunity to talk about the process again.

 

Jessie Lumpkins:

So if you were going to test the pH of a bunch of different soils and they were all supposed to come out perfectly and for some reason it didn't, even that discussion is valuable to students or teachers or whoever's learning from that, because we'll never be able to prepare our students for every time they need to collect or analyze data. So we can't anticipate every single thing that goes wrong, what we can discuss is those things that are different and why they were different and how next time to make it more consistent. So having said all that, I think that... I wonder if there are teachers who think maybe there's CASE police that's going to come get them or that something would go wrong or that they have to adapt that lesson and they're worried that they couldn't do it with the exact fidelity that they learned it with.

Jessie Lumpkins:

 

But if you're not able to provide that data to students or the way that they collect it, because your virtual isn't exactly the same, we know and we think and we see that there are teachers who are doing that data collection on their own and they're sharing that data with students. And then you can get back to the actual discussion, which is what was that objective? What were you collecting the data for? What are you ultimately wanting to learn from that data? And I think that with some of those in person wet labs, APPs, I can imagine and I'm not in the classroom anymore, how daunting it would be to try to get students to go through that, when if we remember that it's process over the product, our teachers are amazing. And when they keep that in mind, I know that they're going to be able to provide that information to students, so they can still have that experience.

 

Alan Green:

I think that's such a great point too. And I think some of the best lesson plans that we have as teachers are the ones that are unplanned or when they don't go the right way. So I think that's absolutely wonderful to focus more on the process, versus the actual product in getting those right numbers. Anything else, I guess for CASE certified teachers as they're implementing the curriculum? Anything else that they should be keeping in mind or advice you would give them about implementing them either online or in person with social distancing standards?

 

Sara Cobb:

Yeah. So I would just encourage them to keep the why at the forefront. Why are they having their students complete that APP? Or even if it's not a CASE course and it's a lesson in one of their shop classes or an Ag leadership course or something else that they teach that isn't CASE related. Always go back to that why, the struggle with technology and education is a lot of times you can get down a rabbit trail of chasing the technology and then losing the why of what you're teaching to begin with. And it's difficult to train your students to use technology and to have the technology be a mechanism of facilitating content and not being the content itself. So for example, we know a lot of schools right now are transitioning into learning management systems like Google Classroom or Schoology or Canvas or whatever it is being used at that location. And you want your students to be able to focus on the content that you're trying to share across the platform, not on how to use the platform.

 

Sara Cobb:

So, as you look at adapting content and adapting the way that you teach, whether you're full remote, whether you're in a hybrid situation or you're in person but your paperless now to help with contacts, so you have to do everything through a computer. Just constantly going back to that why. Do I really need to use six different software platforms for this one week project or can I just use one or two and still get that same point across? And that's one of the things that we really hope to help teachers with during the Thrive Conference, is how do you select the right tools to teach the concepts that you need to teach? And how do you maintain the modality that you like to teach it? So that's another struggle with CASE curriculum, is in the digital world. CASE's inquiry based and project based. And so how does that translate digitally? And so we're working internally right now on translating or transferring a lot of our curriculum, we're going to start with AFNR and ASP into a virtual mode for teachers so that those modifications will have already been made.

 

Sara Cobb:

So we're trying to... We're wearing our teacher hat and trying to identify what is the best possible modification for the APPs and those courses that allows a student to focus on the content and not the technology that's being used to teach it. And so if we keep going back to the why and keep that at our forefront, that's really going to help to be able to maintain that inquiry model and maintain that project model and not fall back into the rote memorization give and take model of education that CASE really tries to push teachers beyond.

 

Jessie Lumpkins:

That basically drills down to the process over the product, because there will be an APP that somebody comes upon and maybe the institute that you went to. In that moment, you may be thinking, "I don't know a way to adapt this." But if you go back to, "Well, what's the objective?" You may have a more simple way of doing that virtually. Or if everything goes bust and all you needed to do is discuss, "Well, what were we getting at?" If you remember the why, you'll always be able to adapt. I think that's well said.

 

Alan Green:

Awesome. Well, one last question before we wrap up this conversation for anyone who's listening, how can they stay up to date on current CASE programming and current CASE events?

 

Jessie Lumpkins:

So we have several different avenues that you can utilize to stay up to date. Of course, always bookmark caseforlearning.org, because anything important like, Sara discussing the Thrive Conference, we have a link for that already. Some of the overviews and the highlights, we have the call for presenters for that and the application. And so of course, when we have our 2021 PD go live and we can start to market that and also have registration that you'll be able to see that on the site. But I would also encourage you if you're active on Facebook to take advantage of liking both our main page that we like to push updates out on and also that CASE teacher meetup group. And one last thing I'd like to throw out there is if you have ever received emails for from NAAE or CASE before, when we send those emails, again, that is the email that you have on file on your my CASE profile. Whatever email that is, is what we'd like to send out our large HTML email blasts on, our very important things. Our scholarships, when institutes come open and things like that.

 

Jessie Lumpkins:

We have noticed that there might be some folks who either accidentally or because it might have just been attached to a different set of emails, you could have unsubscribed or suppressed the email. And so we're not able to send any more of those updates. So you might just want to check on anything that you've unsubscribed from and see if they're being blocked or being sent to spam. If you don't ever receive HTML emails anymore and you think you should be, you can always send me an email and I'll get you back on that list. But our website, our Facebook and our email distribution list are the three best ways to stay up to date.

 

Alan Green:

Awesome. Well, thank you so much again, Sara and Jessie for joining us today and for providing such great updates on current CASE programming. I'm sure that things will continue to change as we navigate these uncertain times together and I think CASE continues to deliver to teachers and provide the resources and information that they need. Thank you again.

 

Jessie Lumpkins:

Thanks so much. We're here to help teachers, so let us know what you need.

 

Sara Cobb:

Thanks for having us, it was great to chat today.

 

Alan Green:

Thank you for joining us for this episode of Connect, a podcast by the National Association of Agricultural Educators. It's always hard to say goodbye, but we'll be back with more episodes to help you build even more connections to help you grow as a professional. If you like what you've heard, we'd love to have you subscribe, rate or give us a review on iTunes or whatever platform you use, so we can help connect more agricultural educators to our podcast. Until next time.

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