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National Teach Ag Day

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Agricultural Education for All is a joint partnership of the National Association of Agricultural Educators and the National FFA Organization with the goal of ensuring all in agricultural education feel welcome, safe and celebrated as their authentic selves. Every month in New Teacher News and Teach Ag Times, we will feature some of the outstanding teachers making a difference and creating inclusive, diverse and equitable programs for their students. For more information about Agricultural Education for All, please contact Ellen Thompson.

 

This month, we would like to introduce you to Hailey NierlingHailey is a senior at Southwest Minnesota State University, majoring in agricultural education, and will be student teaching this fall. She is dedicated to the future of agricultural education and ensuring our classrooms are a safe and welcoming environment for all. 

Who/what inspired you to become an ag teacher? I have always been an involved agriculture advocate. I enjoy talking, discovering, and engaging in everything agriculture-related. I was always fond of discussions I would have with peers who would ask me about fascinating agriculture topics. This, combined with my already-flourished love for the industry and FFA, inspired me to consider a career in agricultural education. When I reflected on what my career goals were, a degree in agricultural education met all my criteria. I have not thought about doing anything else since!

 

What are you most excited about for student teaching? I wanted my student teaching experience to be unique and push me outside of my comfort zone. My mentor teacher is the definition of an enterprising person. I am most excited to work under someone with such drive and initiative as he has. His classes are ones that will push me out of my comfort zone and teach me about other areas of agriculture! I’m also excited to watch my students learn alongside me this upcoming semester and watch them grow through their agriculture classes.

 

What advice do you have for your fellow preservice teachers as they begin to think about creating an inclusive and safe environment for your students to be their true, authentic selves? Sometimes students deserve to receive the benefit of the doubt. A student misbehaving in class could mean they’re just having a bad day or there could be a deeper meaning to their behavior that we don’t know about. Encourage a conversation with said student in private. Sometimes, showing you care is enough for a student to feel safe and included in the environment you created.    

 

What advice do you have for your fellow preservice teachers about being their true and authentic selves in the classroom? Why is that so important? Some of the best advice I’ve ever received from a mentor teacher was to “let students into your life in an appropriate manner.” So often teachers feel they need to mask so much of their lives to their students. At the end of the day, we’re all human and we’re not always at 100%. When this mentor of mine is having a hard day, she lets her students know that. This goes vice versa, when she’s having a good day as well. She has seen this help her be her true, authentic self, but also improve relationships and trust between her and her students.

 

What is your advice to the ag ed profession to make ag ed a welcoming place for everyone? There is a place for all students in the agriculture classroom. I challenge ag ed professionals to implement this idea while recruiting for their agriculture programs as well. Help students of all interests and backgrounds find their place in your program to make them feel welcome and a part of your family.   

 

Agricultural Education for All is a joint partnership of the National Association of Agricultural Educators and the National FFA Organization with the goal of ensuring all in agricultural education feel welcome, safe and celebrated as their authentic selves. Every month in New Teacher News and Teach Ag Times, we will feature some of the outstanding teachers making a difference and creating inclusive, diverse and equitable programs for their students. For more information about Agricultural Education for All, please contact Ellen Thompson.

 

This month, we would like to introduce you to Jessica Fernandes. Jessica is the agriculture teacher at Buena Park High School, in Buena Park, California. Over the course of her 21-year teaching career, she has made great strides in providing her students and community with an inclusive and equitable agriculture program that reaches far beyond the walls of the classroom. 

 

Who/what inspired you to be an ag teacher? Oddly enough, I left high school knowing that being an ag teacher was the last thing I wanted to do. I went and earned a degree in political science lol. During this process the agriculture program I graduated from, Don Lugo High School, in Chino, needed an agriculture teacher and I was excited to take advantage of an opportunity to work with my agriculture teacher, Kathy Gassen. My life was forever changed for the better after that.

 

What motivates you to continue to teach ag? Honestly the students and the wonderment or "ah-ha moments" are what keep me going. COVID has been tough, but maintaining high standards, keeping all three circles going and building student relationships has helped me maintain my sanity and love of the job.

 

What advice do you have for new teachers to create an inclusive and safe environment for your students to be their true, authentic selves? Inclusiveness and safety are built by listening -- listening to your students' needs and what THEY want out of the program. I take my students on a tour of our facility every year. As we walk, we review what other students have asked for/created in previous years. When we get to the end we ask them for new ideas, things they want to be able to do, and contests they want to get involved in. This creates a culture of students who want to be there because the program is accessible to them and what they want. 

 

What advice do you have for new teachers about being their true and authentic selves in the classroom? Why is that so important? The kids can see right through fairness and lack of sincerity. Be you, show them the love you have for agriculture and the love you have for them reaching success. They just want to belong, to be loved and be part of a family, and agriculture programs can and do provide all of those things.

 

What is your advice to the ag ed profession to make ag ed a welcoming place for everyone? The ag ed profession is welcoming! I think this past year really proves that! Between ag ed discussion boards and people sharing curriculum left and right, the family aspect, as we try to navigate the pandemic, has been unprecedented and unbelievable. I hope that we continue to utilize mentor programs nationwide and continue the willingness of sharing to help our colleagues. 

 

Totally Acceptable. . . . 

  1. To take a mental health day. We're in the homestretch of the school year now, so it is important to stay mentally fit and motivated,
  2. To make a list of everything you have accomplished during this bizarre school year and then give yourself a pat on the back for a job well done,
  3. To add a piece of artwork to your classroom or workspace; something that inspires you to continue making a difference in students' lives each and every day,
  4. To take extra time for yourself to enjoy the beautiful sunshine and extra daylight,
  5. To be proud of who you are as a teacher!!!
 

Stay Inspired!

 

My Corner of the World

What could be more exciting than to be nominated as one of the 2021 Top Teachers on LIVE with Kelly and Ryan??? Follow this link to vote for our very own Krista Pontius, agriculture teacher at Greenwood High School, in Pennsylvania!!!Get your votes in by NOON EDT on April 29th!!!!

 

Want Your Picture in New Teacher News???
Send a high-quality picture of your desk (or your colleague's desk) to Andrea Fristoe & look for your picture in an upcoming edition!

 

Ag Education for ALL!

Agricultural Education for All is a joint partnership of the National Association of Agricultural Educators and the National FFA Organization with the goal of ensuring all in agricultural education feel welcome, safe and celebrated as their authentic selves. Every month in New Teacher News we will feature some of the outstanding teachers making a difference and creating inclusive, diverse and equitable programs for their students. 

This month, we would like to introduce you to David Ruvarac. David was the agriculture teacher at WB Saul High School of Agricultural Sciences, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Recently, he has taken on a new role as an Occupational Advisory Committee Specialist through the Pennsylvania Commission for Agricultural Education Excellence, where he continues to make a positive impact on the agricultural education profession by working directly with teachers across the state of Pennsylvania. 

 

Ag Teacher Tips & Tools

Fruit Production and the Environment STEM Case: Lesson Info: ExploreLearning
It's an interactive guided STEM/case study. "As an agricultural scientist, students help a strawberry farmer who is having problems with low fruit production. Students learn about the factors involved in fruit production including plant nutrients, pollination and bees, and the interaction with the environment. Check it out!

Thanks Dan Doeing for sharing this resource on the Ag Education Discussion Lab Facebook Group!

 

Share Your Ag Teacher Tips and Tools!
Have a great idea or resource for the classroom? Share it with us! Contact Andrea Fristoe and look for your idea in an upcoming edition of New Teacher News!

 

Healthy Habits

12 Simple Habits to Relieve Stress

This infographic will show you 12 simple habits to relieve stress. They won’t take you more than a few minutes every day, they will make a big difference on your well-being, and even impact your productivity

 
 
 

NAAE Membership Benefits

Awards and Grants

NAAE takes pride in recognizing excellence in agricultural education as well as individuals and organizations that make outstanding contributions to the profession. Members have the opportunity to apply for state and national recognition or nominate other individuals or organizations for recognition through a variety of programs. 

 

NAAE Connect Podcast

Working with Middle School Learners

Ahh, middle schoolers. If you’ve worked with middle school students before, you probably know that they can be some of the most excited and engaged students to work with, but at times, some of the most difficult to work with too. Middle school learners find themselves in a unique stage of their lives filled with new opportunities, peer pressure, insecurities, and both emotional and physical changes. As agricultural educators, what can you do to capitalize on middle schoolers’ unique qualities?

 

Before You Go. . . 

 
 
 
 
 

Contact Us

National Association of Agricultural Educators 
2525 Harrodsburg Road
Suite 200
Lexington, KY 40504

859-967-2892

 

The National Teach Ag Campaign is led by the National Association of Agricultural Educators. For more information, visit the Teach Ag website. 
Funding for the National Teach Ag Campaign is provided by the CHS Foundation, Corteva Agriscience™, Growth Energy, and BASF.

Andrea Fristoe

Be the Change! #TeachAg

Posted by Andrea Fristoe Apr 28, 2021

The school year will be coming to a close before we know it. What plans have you made on your #TeachAg journey so far? No matter what decisions you make as you begin your major and career, know that you are a part of the positive change and growth in agricultural education and the 
BEST. CAREER. EVER!

 
 

Ag Education for ALL!

Agricultural Education for All is a joint partnership of the National Association of Agricultural Educators and the National FFA Organization with the goal of ensuring all in agricultural education feel welcome, safe and celebrated as their authentic selves. Every month in Teach Ag Times we will feature some of the outstanding teachers making a difference and creating inclusive, diverse and equitable programs for their students. 

This month, we would like to introduce you to David Ruvarac. David was the agriculture teacher at WB Saul High School of Agricultural Sciences, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Recently, he has taken on a new role as an Occupational Advisory Committee Specialist through the Pennsylvania Commission for Agricultural Education Excellence, where he continues to make a positive impact on the agricultural education profession by working directly with teachers across the state of Pennsylvania. 

 
 
 

"Being an agricultural education major means there is always an opportunity for growth." 
-Madeleine Musick

 

Meet Madeleine

Teach Ag Ambassador Spotlight

Each year the National Teach Ag Campaign selects an elite group of preservice agriculture teachers to represent the future of ag education.

This month, we are featuring Madeleine Musick a senior at the Oklahoma State University, majoring in agricultural education. 

Follow the link below to find out what she is looking forward to most about becoming an ag teacher. Plus, find out why Oklahoma State University is a great option for pursuing a degree in ag education.

 
 

#TeachAg on Twitter

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Contact Us

National Association of Agricultural Educators 
2525 Harrodsburg Road
Suite 200
Lexington, KY 40504

859-967-2892

 

The National Teach Ag Campaign is led by the National Association of Agricultural Educators. For more information, visit the Teach Ag website. 
Funding for the National Teach Ag Campaign is provided by the CHS Foundation, Corteva Agriscience™, Growth Energy, and BASF.

 

Agricultural Education for All is a joint partnership of the National Association of Agricultural Educators and the National FFA Organization with the goal of ensuring all in agricultural education feel welcome, safe and celebrated as their authentic selves. Every month in New Teacher News and Teach Ag Times, we will feature some of the outstanding teachers making a difference and creating inclusive, diverse and equitable programs for their students. For more information about Agricultural Education for All, please contact Ellen Thompson.

 

This month, we would like to introduce you to David Ruvarac. David was the agriculture teacher at WB Saul High School of Agricultural Sciences, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Recently, he has taken on a new role as an Occupational Advisory Committee Specialist through the Pennsylvania Commission for Agricultural Education Excellence, where he continues to make a positive impact on the agricultural education profession by working directly with teachers across the state of Pennsylvania. 

 

Who/what inspired you to be an ag teacher? As a child my family moved quite often, mainly to urban and suburban areas. Wanting to be a veterinarian, I was able to attend Colonial High School in Orlando, Florida. They have an agriculture program and FFA chapter. Being there I soon realized that there is a major gap in agricultural literacy and knowledge in urban/suburban and non-traditional communities. In college I decided that I wanted to focus on teaching and working with non-traditional students, schools, and communities.

 

What motivates you to continue to teach ag? My motivation stems from two things; my internal drive and the positive impact I have seen in my students. Agricultural education and the FFA can open so many doors for students. It is great seeing students grow, develop, and thrive with my support.

 

What advice do you have for new teachers to create an inclusive and safe environment for your students to be their true, authentic selves? I think it is important to be open and accepting. Everyone is unique in some way, but those “uniqueness’s” are what connect us. Having an open door and showing the students that you genuinely care is vital. I make sure that I treat all my students the same, never singling out a student for any reason. It is important to let the students see or know about your “uniqueness’s.” I also did simple things like avoiding discussion on specific religion, having open discussion on differences, listening to the students, getting to know the students on a personal level, and learning from my mistakes. We are all going to make mistakes by saying or doing the wrong thing, but at the end of the day you need to apologize and learn from them. Get involved with school activities outside of agriculture. Go to sporting events, cheer on your students, get involved with spirit week, volunteer to get pied in the face during pep rallies, etc. When the students see you “outside” of the classroom, they see you outside of being a teacher. This allows them to step outside of the “student” role and be themselves.

 

What advice do you have for new teachers about being their true and authentic selves in the classroom? Why is that so important? Be yourself and have fun. Don’t try to fit the “mold” of what an agriculture teacher should look like or act like. While it raised some eyebrows initially, when I first started teaching I had a mohawk. I had just moved to New Mexico and was obviously new to the school. I wanted my kids to see me for who I am. Wear those bright colors or cowboy boots. Have fun with your appearance or teaching style. This will help you become more confident, but also allow the students to be more confident. When they see you being yourself, having fun and showing confidence, it will allow them to do the same. Students warm up to teachers they feel comfortable with. Those are usually the teachers who are confident and engaged. There is a major difference between confidence and arrogance. It is important to make sure that you aren’t arrogant.

 

What is your advice to the ag ed profession to make ag ed a welcoming place for everyone? Get to know your students and have fun. Let your students see you being yourself. When they see that, they will be more willing to be themselves. Get involved outside of the classroom so other students see you outside of the ag program. Have fun, be willing to make a fool of yourself. Put up the inclusion logo on your door. Have an open door policy and be willing to step out of the teacher role sometimes and just be you.

 

There are a lot of decisions to be made as you begin your journey to become an ag teacher. From finding the best institution to attend, to figuring out which scholarships to apply for, decisions can be hard. But no matter what, you are bound for greatness in the BEST. CAREER. EVER!

 
 

Ag Education for ALL!

Agricultural Education for All is a joint partnership of the National Association of Agricultural Educators and the National FFA Organization with the goal of ensuring all in agricultural education feel welcome, safe and celebrated as their authentic selves. Every month in Teach Ag Times we will feature some of the outstanding teachers making a difference and creating inclusive, diverse and equitable programs for their students. 

This month, we would like to introduce you to Paul Young, agriculture teacher at Cape Fear High School, in Fayetteville, North Carolina. Paul has been teaching agriculture for three years, inspiring his students to become agriculturalists and leaders, while promoting diversity, inclusion, and equity in his classroom and in the ag education profession.  

 
 
 
 

"When I enter the classroom, I look forward to watching my students step outside of their comfort zones and fulfill their personal potential in learning and leadership."
-Zach Mills

 

Meet Zach

Teach Ag Ambassador Spotlight

Each year the National Teach Ag Campaign selects an elite group of preservice agriculture teachers to represent the future of ag education.

This month, we are featuring Zach Mills a senior at the University of Tennessee at Martin, majoring in agricultural education. 

Follow the link below to find out what inspired him to become an educator Plus, find out why the University of Tennessee at Martin is a great option for pursuing a degree in ag education.

 
 

#TeachAg on Twitter

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Contact Us

National Association of Agricultural Educators 
2525 Harrodsburg Road
Suite 200
Lexington, KY 40504

859-967-2892

 

The National Teach Ag Campaign is a project of the National Council for Agricultural Education, led by the National Association of Agricultural Educators. For more information, visit the Teach Ag website. Funding for the National Teach Ag Campaign is provided by the CHS Foundation, Corteva Agriscience™, Growth Energy, and BASF as a special project of the National FFA Foundation.

Agricultural Education for All is a joint partnership of the National Association of Agricultural Educators and the National FFA Organization with the goal of ensuring all in agricultural education feel welcome, safe and celebrated as their authentic selves. Every month in New Teacher News and Teach Ag Times, we will feature some of the outstanding teachers making a difference and creating inclusive, diverse and equitable programs for their students. For more information about Agricultural Education for All, please contact Ellen Thompson.

 

This month, we would like to introduce you to Paul Young, agriculture teacher at Cape Fear High School, in Fayetteville, North Carolina. Paul has been teaching agriculture for three years, inspiring his students to become agriculturalists and leaders, while promoting diversity, inclusion, and equity in his classroom and in the ag education profession.  

 

Who inspired you to be an ag teacher? My grandmother and my high school ag teacher both inspired me to become an ag teacher. 

 

What motivates you to continue to teach ag? Agriculture was a huge part of my life ever since I was a child. I can remember being out in the garden with my grandmother helping her sow seeds, successfully tending to them and cooking the produce. I also helped tend to a small flock of chickens and a few pigs too. Many people are not aware of the importance of agriculture and where their food comes from and the processes that take place on the farm, so that is what motivates me to continue teaching agriculture. Promoting agriculture and making my students literate about agriculture.

 

What advice do you have for new teachers to create an inclusive and safe environment for your students to be their true, authentic selves? Whenever it’s your first time meeting new students it’s more than likely their first time meeting some of their new classmates, I always give those students the opportunity to break the ice between themselves and their classmates. Students may find their new best friend or even a new hobby in your classroom. Many students may not have friends, but since you engaged them in meeting new people, they may have found a new friend. Also, let your students know that you are there for them. Show your students that you love and support them, which is very vital in the times that we are in now. 

 

What advice do you have for new teachers about being their true and authentic selves in the classroom? Why is that so important? Whenever you teach, in the classroom incorporate your personality and let your students know about you. Show them that you once sat in the same places they’re sitting in as middle or high school students. You will develop meaningful relationships with them and they will know you as a person, then teaching will be so much easier and enjoyable simply because you have established an authentic bond with your students. I am a very humorous teacher and I make learning more enjoyable -- students are excited to come to my class simply because they know that they are going to get some humor in class whenever they are present.

 

What is your advice to the ag ed profession to make ag ed a welcoming place for everyone? Embrace diversity head first. We are all different on the outside, but regardless of our differences we must be helpful regardless of the differences that we may exhibit. As a teacher, I make every effort to assist my students in some kind of way that is helpful to them, whether it's helping out with their acceptance in higher learning, finding a trade, or putting them on a team. I also give my students plenty of advice that is very beneficial to them. I make myself available for all of my students so that they know that they have the support they need at school.

 

Totally Acceptable. . . . 

  1. To be intentional about your self-care practices,
  2. To take a mental health day,
  3. To take advantage of the good weather days and make sure to get out in the sunshine,
  4. To start a new exercise routine,
  5. To journal your thoughts and feelings in order to process these uncertain times, reflect on yourself, and find positive solutions to life's challenges!
 

Stay Inspired!

 

Our Corner of the World

In honor of National FFA Week, NAAE is throwing it back with pictures of our staff when they were FFA members and advisors.
Can you tell who is who?

 

Want Your Picture in New Teacher News???
Send a high-quality picture of your desk (or your colleague's desk) to Andrea Fristoe & look for your picture in an upcoming edition!

 

Ag Education for ALL!

Agricultural Education for All is a joint partnership of the National Association of Agricultural Educators and the National FFA Organization with the goal of ensuring all in agricultural education feel welcome, safe and celebrated as their authentic selves. Every month in New Teacher News we will feature some of the outstanding teachers making a difference and creating inclusive, diverse and equitable programs for their students. 

This month, we would like to introduce you to Sabrina Davis, agriculture teacher at Arabia Mountain High School Academy of Engineering, Medicine and Environmental Studies, in Lithonia, Georgia. As an agriculture teacher for over 25 years, Sabrina has played a vital role in the progress agricultural education continues to make in the areas of inclusion, diversity and equity in and out of the classroom.

 

Ag Teacher Tips & Tools

Special Offer from Realityworks!
Thanks so much to our outstanding partners at Realityworks who are currently offering a 10% discount on large animal models. Follow this link to learn more & check out the Ag Education Discussion Lab on Facebook for more great ideas & deals!

 

Share Your Ag Teacher Tips and Tools!
Have a great idea or resource for the classroom? Share it with us! Contact Andrea Fristoe and look for your idea in an upcoming edition of New Teacher News!

 

Healthy Habits

 

30 Day Happiness Challenge!

As we try to come out of a dark winter amidst a global pandemic, it can be hard to stay positive. Check out this 30 Day Happiness Challenge and see if it can help improve your mind, body, and soul.

 
 
 

NAAE Membership Benefits

Legislative Advocacy for the Profession

NAAE monitors governmental affairs affecting agricultural education and assists in developing priorities and strategies to affect federal legislation and appropriations. NAAE also has representatives on several national boards to represent your interests and concerns.

 

Promising Practices

Navigating the World of Online and Hybrid Teaching

Agricultural educators across the United States are in the midst of a challenging school year. Since the COVID-19 outbreak, many teachers are finding themselves teaching entirely remotely, following a hybrid model, or teaching in-person while following social distancing standards. In this podcast, we’re focusing on what agricultural educators can do to make online and hybrid teaching more successful for themselves and their students. For this episode, we’re joined by Ms. Kim O’Byrne of Hatch Valley Middle School in New Mexico and Mr. Jesse Faber of Pontiac Township High School in Illinois. Kim and Jesse provide valuable information about what has been working for them and what they’ve learned as they navigate this new world of online and hybrid teaching.

 
 
 
 

Before You Go. . . 

 
 
 
 
 

Contact Us

National Association of Agricultural Educators 
2525 Harrodsburg Road
Suite 200
Lexington, KY 40504

859-967-2892

 

The National Teach Ag Campaign is a project of the National Council for Agricultural Education, led by the National Association of Agricultural Educators. For more information, visit the Teach Ag website. Funding for the National Teach Ag Campaign is provided by the CHS Foundation, Corteva Agriscience™, Growth Energy, and BASF as a special project of the National FFA Foundation.

 

Let's continue to GROW as we journey on through 2021. Develop your professional network, build on existing relationships within the profession, and continue to define who you are as a future ag teacher. We may still be in a state of uncertainty, but one thing is for sure....ag education is the BEST. CAREER. EVER!

 
 

Ag Education for ALL!

Agricultural Education for All is a joint partnership of the National Association of Agricultural Educators and the National FFA Organization with the goal of ensuring all in agricultural education feel welcome, safe and celebrated as their authentic selves. Every month in Teach Ag Times we will feature some of the outstanding teachers making a difference and creating inclusive, diverse and equitable programs for their students. 

This month, we would like to introduce you to Sabrina Davis, agriculture teacher at Arabia Mountain High School Academy of Engineering, Medicine and Environmental Studies, in Lithonia, Georgia. As an agriculture teacher for over 25 years, Sabrina has played a vital role in the progress agricultural education continues to make in the areas of inclusion, diversity and equity in and out of the classroom.

 
 
 
 

"If you know that teaching ag is what you want to do, go for it and do not let anyone or anything stop you."
-John Bazemore

 

Meet John

Teach Ag Ambassador Spotlight

Each year the National Teach Ag Campaign selects an elite group of preservice agriculture teachers to represent the future of ag education.

This month, we are featuring John Bazemore a junior at Abraham Baldwin Agricultural College, majoring in agricultural education. 

Follow the link below to find out what he is looking forward to most about teaching ag. Plus, find out why Abraham Baldwin Agricultural College is a great option for pursuing a degree in ag education.

 
 

#TeachAg on Twitter

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Contact Us

National Association of Agricultural Educators 
2525 Harrodsburg Road
Suite 200
Lexington, KY 40504

859-967-2892

 

The National Teach Ag Campaign is a project of the National Council for Agricultural Education, led by the National Association of Agricultural Educators. For more information, visit the Teach Ag website. Funding for the National Teach Ag Campaign is provided by the CHS Foundation, Corteva Agriscience™, Growth Energy, and BASF as a special project of the National FFA Foundation.

 

Agricultural Education for All is a joint partnership of the National Association of Agricultural Educators and the National FFA Organization with the goal of ensuring all in agricultural education feel welcome, safe and celebrated as their authentic selves. Every month in New Teacher News and Teach Ag Times, we will feature some of the outstanding teachers making a difference and creating inclusive, diverse and equitable programs for their students. For more information about Agricultural Education for All, please contact Ellen Thompson.

 

This month, we would like to introduce you to Sabrina Davis, agriculture teacher at Arabia Mountain High School Academy of Engineering Medicine and Environmental Studies, in Lithonia, Georgia. As an agriculture teacher for over 25 years, Sabrina has played a vital role in the progress agricultural education continues to make in the areas of inclusion, diversity and equity in and out of the classroom.

 

 

Who/what inspired you to be an ag teacher? It is a combination of a lot of experiences that influence me to become an ag teacher. Teaching others was natural for me because I learned all of my “student teaching” from my mother, who taught Business/Typing for 37 years. I spent my afternoons playing “schoolhouse” with friends and I would always play the role of the teacher, so I was teaching before I knew this would be my career. My love for agriculture started during the many summers of running in cow pastures, shucking corn, shelling peas, and spending time with family and friends in rural North Carolina and Alabama. This love of the agriculture lifestyle sparked a love for stray animals and gardening in me.  My dream was to attend veterinarian college, but life took control and I became agriculture teacher in 1998.

 

What motivates you to continue to teach ag? My motivation is to expose African American students to agricultural careers and connect their knowledge and leadership skills in agricultural careers. Teaching at an engineering and environmental science school, students do not know how agriculture is connected to all pathways offered. I want to expose all students to everything agriculture-related.  I want my students to see African American agriculture leaders are in various roles in the agriculture industry. 

 

What advice do you have for new teachers to create an inclusive and safe environment for your students to be their true, authentic selves? My advice is to know your students! Create a FFAmily within your classrooms!  It is important because it helps eliminate stereotypical biases and attitudes towards others. Make sure that everyone is comfortable and give everyone space to showcase their talents. Students should have a voice and teachers should give them the opportunity, in a respectful manner, to communicate their issues with others. All teachers should have a positive environment for all students and accommodate different student learning styles. A safe, positive classroom enhances a productive and nurturing environment.

 

What advice do you have for new teachers about being their true and authentic selves in the classroom? Why is that so important? In order to gain trust from their students, a teacher must have a connection with their students and show vulnerability. Building a solid foundation with students will develop a solid learning environment where everyone will be successful. We, as teachers, must be relatable and allow our experiences to assist with guiding students to be their best. Students only feel secure when their teachers are open and truthful about themselves.  

 

What is your advice to the ag ed profession to make ag ed a welcoming place for everyone? The agricultural education profession should be open to change. This is not my grandfather’s agriculture program anymore! Our profession has evolved into a remarkably diverse, innovative, and technologically-advanced program that has extended more opportunities and careers for students. We need the expertise from all those with different backgrounds that can deliver knowledge of these new agriculture advancements. We need to prepare a multitude of students to work in production, biotechnology, engineering, entrepreneurial endeavors, and mentoring programs.  Students need to see a more diverse group of educators who value change within agricultural education and who will stand solid in their part in this inspiring task!

 

Totally Acceptable. . . . 

  1. To make it a priority in 2021 to appreciate the "small things" in life,
  2. To discover a new hobby that can help you decompress from the uncertainty of our current circumstances,
  3. To take a scheduled day (or days) off just to relax and regain your mental strength,
  4. To be patient with your students and yourself as you navigate the remainder of this school year,
  5. To choose kindness in every situation.
 

Stay Inspired!

 

My Corner of the World

 

Has COVID-19 redirected your path in ag education? Maybe you've decided to go back to school or start your Master's. For Amador Gonzales, pursuing his Master's in Ag Education and Extension at New Mexico State University has given him the opportunity to learn AND teach as a graduate assistant! 

 
 

Want Your Picture in New Teacher News???
Send a high-quality picture of your desk (or your colleague's desk) to Andrea Fristoe & look for your picture in an upcoming edition!

 
 

Ag Teacher Tips & Tools

National FFA Week 2021 Dedicated Thread
Check out the National FFA Week thread for great and innovative ideas for your classroom and program! Thanks Riley Hintzsche for posting this on the Ag Education Discussion lab!

 

Share Your Ag Teacher Tips and Tools!
Have a great idea or resource for the classroom? Share it with us! Contact Andrea Fristoe and look for your idea in an upcoming edition of New Teacher News!

 

Healthy Habits

 

Tips & Trick for Deep-Cleaning Your Home

Winter is here, but that means spring is coming and it will be time to deep-clean our homes! Check out these great tips and tricks you can use to get rid of the crustiness!

 
 
 

NAAE Membership Benefits

NAAE Agricultural Educator Relief Fund

The NAAE Agricultural Educator Relief Fund is designed to assist individual NAAE active members during a time of personal crisis or need. NAAE members may receive up to a $500 stipend to help them through a difficult time. The fund is made possible by the support of state associations and private donors.

 

Promising Practices

Distance Learning Activities

Looking for some animal science or veterinary science resources as you navigate online instruction? Check out these great virtual learning resources from Kristin Sheehan on Communities of Practice!

 
 
 
 

Before You Go. . . 

 
 
 
 
 

Contact Us

National Association of Agricultural Educators 
2525 Harrodsburg Road
Suite 200
Lexington, KY 40504

859-967-2892

 

The National Teach Ag Campaign is a project of the National Council for Agricultural Education, led by the National Association of Agricultural Educators. For more information, visit the Teach Ag website. Funding for the National Teach Ag Campaign is provided by the CHS Foundation, Corteva Agriscience™, Growth Energy, and BASF as a special project of the National FFA Foundation.

 

 

We learned a lot in 2020. Let's put it all to good use as we navigate a new year and a new journey to the BEST. CAREER. EVER!

 
 
 
 
 

 "I believe in going forth each day living your why."
-Kathryn Lampi

 

Meet Kathryn

Teach Ag Ambassador Spotlight

Each year the National Teach Ag Campaign selects an elite group of preservice agriculture teachers to represent the future of ag education.

This month, we are featuring Kathryn Lampi, a senior at the University of Wisconsin-River Falls, majoring in agricultural education. 

Follow the link below to find out more about her most-rewarding experience as an ag education major. Plus, find out why the University of Wisconsin-River Falls is a great option for pursuing a degree in ag education.

 
 

#TeachAg on Twitter

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Contact Us

National Association of Agricultural Educators 
2525 Harrodsburg Road
Suite 200
Lexington, KY 40504

859-967-2892

 

The National Teach Ag Campaign is a project of the National Council for Agricultural Education, led by the National Association of Agricultural Educators. For more information, visit the Teach Ag website. Funding for the National Teach Ag Campaign is provided by the CHS Foundation, Corteva Agriscience™, Growth Energy, and BASF as a special project of the National FFA Foundation.

 

Totally Acceptable. . . . 

  1. To wear holiday-themed attire to school each day (no matter if it's virtual, in-person, or a hybrid),
  2. To be thinking of new and innovative ways you can continue to make a positive impact in students' lives as we move into 2021,
  3. To have a greater appreciation for family and friends this year than ever before,
  4. To order a Peppermint Mocha a few more times than usual this holiday season,
  5. To know that YOU ARE AN AMAZING AG TEACHER and the NAAE National Teach Ag Campaign sees all of your hard work and determination to make this school year a success!!!!!!
 
 

My Corner of the World

 

Still using your bitmoji classroom? Hang in there! We will make it through this school year together! In the meantime, check out this pretty awesome virtual greenhouse classroom from Terra Pigg, agriculture teacher at George Rogers Clark High School, in Winchester, Kentucky.

 
 

Want Your Picture in New Teacher News???
Send a high-quality picture of your desk (or your colleague's desk) to Andrea Fristoe & look for your picture in an upcoming edition!

 
 

Ag Education for ALL!

Agricultural Education for All is a joint partnership of the National Association of Agricultural Educators and the National FFA Organization with the goal of ensuring all in agricultural education feel welcome, safe and celebrated as their authentic selves. Every month in New Teacher News we will feature some of the outstanding teachers making a difference and creating inclusive, diverse and equitable programs for their students. 

This month, we would like to introduce you to Dr. Veronica Sanders, agriculture teacher at Warner Robins High School, in Warner Robins, Georgia. Dr. Sanders plays a vital role in the progress agricultural education continues to make in the areas of inclusion, diversity and equity. Growing up on a farm raising small livestock, Dr. Veronica Sanders never imagined herself teaching agriculture. However, she decided to do so 27 years ago. In 1994, Veronica was the only African American female teaching middle school ag classes in Georgia.

 

Ag Teacher Tips & Tools

Classroom Opportunities at ABAC's Georgia Museum of Agriculture
Check out this great distance learning resource to share with your animal science students! Thanks Sarah Holt Garner for posting this on the Ag Education Discussion lab!

 

Share Your Ag Teacher Tips and Tools!
Have a great idea or resource for the classroom? Share it with us! Contact Andrea Fristoe and look for your idea in an upcoming edition of New Teacher News!

 

Stay Inspired!

 

Healthy Habits

15 Best Games to Play on Zoom with Kids

Zoom is a great way to connect with your friends and family while staying socially distanced. Create these as classroom games for students to stay engaged while remote learning. READ MORE>>

 

 
 
 

NAAE Membership Benefits

Curriculum for Agricultural Science Education (CASE)

More than just curriculum, CASE is a system of instructional support for the classroom teacher that also includes professional development, assessment and certification.
 

 

Promising Practices

Ground and Aerial Robots for Agricultural Production: Opportunities and Challenges

The Council for Agricultural Science and Technology (CAST)?released?a new paper, Ground and Aerial Robots for Agricultural Production: Opportunities and Challenges. It is now available for download.

 
 
 
 

Before You Go. . . 

 

Congratulations to Dr. Wm. Jay Jackman on nearly 25 years of service to the National Association of Agricultural Educators. Jay started his career as the NAAE Executive Director in March 1996. He has worked day in and day out to serve our members, grow NAAE programs, and strengthen our profession. School-based agricultural education is stronger because of his leadership. Congratulations, Jay! We're wishing you an enjoyable and healthy retirement.

 
 
 
 

Contact Us

National Association of Agricultural Educators 
2525 Harrodsburg Road
Suite 200
Lexington, KY 40504

859-967-2892

 

The National Teach Ag Campaign is a project of the National Council for Agricultural Education, led by the National Association of Agricultural Educators. For more information, visit the Teach Ag website. Funding for the National Teach Ag Campaign is provided by the CHS Foundation, Corteva Agriscience™, Growth Energy, and BASF as a special project of the National FFA Foundation.

 

 

It's the most wonderful time of the year! Here at the NAAE National Teach Ag Campaign, we can't think of a better way to celebrate than by choosing the BEST. CAREER. EVER!

 
 

Ag Education for ALL!

Agricultural Education for All is a joint partnership of the National Association of Agricultural Educators and the National FFA Organization with the goal of ensuring all in agricultural education feel welcome, safe and celebrated as their authentic selves. Every month in Teach Ag Times we will feature some of the outstanding teachers making a difference and creating inclusive, diverse and equitable programs for their students. 

This month, we would like to introduce you to Dr. Veronica Sanders, agriculture teacher at Warner Robins High School, in Warner Robins, Georgia. Dr. Sanders plays a vital role in the progress agricultural education continues to make in the areas of inclusion, diversity and equity. Growing up on a farm raising small livestock, Dr. Veronica Sanders never imagined herself teaching agriculture. However, she decided to do so 27 years ago. In 1994, Veronica was the only African American female teaching middle school ag classes in Georgia.

 
 
 

"If you are on the fence about pursuing ag ed, take the leap and follow it with your whole heart." 
-Lisandra Mejia

 

Meet Lisandra

Teach Ag Ambassador Spotlight

Each year the National Teach Ag Campaign selects an elite group of preservice agriculture teachers to represent the future of ag education.

This month, we are featuring Lisandra Mejia, a sophomore at North Carolina State University, majoring in agricultural education. 

Follow the link below to learn who inspired her to become an ag teacher. Plus, find out why North Carolina State University is a great option for pursuing a degree in ag education.

 
 

#TeachAg on Twitter

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Contact Us

National Association of Agricultural Educators 
2525 Harrodsburg Road
Suite 200
Lexington, KY 40504

859-967-2892

 

The National Teach Ag Campaign is a project of the National Council for Agricultural Education, led by the National Association of Agricultural Educators. For more information, visit the Teach Ag website. Funding for the National Teach Ag Campaign is provided by the CHS Foundation, Corteva Agriscience™, Growth Energy, and BASF as a special project of the National FFA Foundation.

Agricultural Education for All is a joint partnership of the National Association of Agricultural Educators and the National FFA Organization with the goal of ensuring all in agricultural education feel welcome, safe and celebrated as their authentic selves. Every month in New Teacher News and Teach Ag Times, we will feature some of the outstanding teachers making a difference and creating inclusive, diverse and equitable programs for their students. For more information about Agricultural Education for All, please contact Ellen Thompson.

 

 

This month, we would like to introduce you to Dr. Veronica Sanders, agriculture teacher at Warner Robins High School, in Warner Robins, Georgia. Dr. Sanders plays a vital role in the progress agricultural education continues to make in the areas of inclusion, diversity and equity. Growing up on a farm raising small livestock, Dr. Veronica Sanders never imagined herself teaching agriculture. However, she decided to do so 27 years ago. In 1994, Veronica was the only African American female teaching middle school ag classes in Georgia.

 

"My passion for my students far outweighs all of the opposition that I have faced throughout my career. I am grateful that I did not give up in the face of adversity. This is an exciting time in agriculture to shape and mold the youth. There have been many significant changes since I started teaching, and I'm grateful to be around still to see them." -- Dr. Veronica Sanders

 

 

Who/what inspired you to be an ag teacher? My parents, Derrick Jones, and Dr. Borne, inspired me to teach.

 

What motivates you to continue to teach ag? I enjoy making a difference in the lives of my students. It's great to make an impact and change their mindset. I believe once you gain knowledge and wisdom, everything can change.

 

What advice do you have for new teachers to create an inclusive and safe environment for your students to be their true, authentic selves? My advice to new teachers would be to BE YOURSELF!!!! There are too many people in the world that are carbon copies. Why be a copy when you can be an original? You can never indeed be great until you can be your authentic self. Those that love you will love you regardless. Be honest about the fact that you are a work in progress. Let students know that you're striving for perfection every day, and you will be for the remainder of your life. Students feel safe when they are around honest teachers. Celebrate their differences and be mindful of the music and videos that you play in class. Please make sure the videos celebrate all students to be great no matter their level. Encourage all students to participate and not just high achievers.

 

What advice do you have for new teachers about being their true and authentic selves in the classroom? Why is that so important? Just as you should always be your authentic self, you are responsible for molding and shaping the minds of our youth. Being your true authentic self is essential and always uphold professional standards and ethics.

 

What is your advice to the ag ed profession to make ag ed a welcoming place for everyone? My advice would be to include all students, celebrate everyone, and be kind and courteous. Pray, laugh, eat jerky, and drink diet coke. Repeat every day.

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