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Ag. Education Advocacy

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This is a feature from the March 2019 edition of NAAE’s News & Views Newsletter. To read News & Views in its entirety, please visit this link.

 

Perkins V Implementation – Advance CTE (the organization for the state directors of career and technical education) has developed some excellent resources to help those interested understand the Strengthening Career and Technical Education for the 21st Century Act (Perkins V) better.

 

The resources related to Perkins V overview include:

  • Understanding the Strengthening Career and Technical Education for the 21st Century Act (Perkins V) (PDF)
    An overview of Perkins including its purpose, how funds are distributed and why Perkins is an investment that matters.
  • Summary and Analysis of Perkins V (PDF)
    An overview of Perkins V, including state and local implications from Advance CTE and ACTE.
  • Major Tenets of Perkins V (PDF)
    A one-page overview of the major tenets of The Strengthening Career and Technical Education for the 21st Century Act (Perkins V) from Advance CTE and ACTE.
  • Perkins V Recorded Webinar 8/2/18 (Webinar)
    A one-hour recorded webinar from ACTE that covers the main provisions of Perkins V.
  • Coordinating Across Perkins V and the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (PDF)
    This guide from Advance CTE and the National Skills Coalition looks at six opportunities to promote coordination across Perkins V and the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) as states develop and implement plans under Perkins V.
  • Perkins V Reauthorization: Opportunities, Challenges and Risks for States (PDF)
    This toolkit by ExcelinEd looks at eight new opportunities in Perkins V for states to consider how to implement high-quality CTE programs.

 

Additional resources are available related to:

  • Access and Equity
  • Career Advisement and Development
  • Local Application/Local Needs Assessment
  • Cross-sector Strategies and Governance
  • Data and Accountability
  • Perkins State Plan
  • Secondary and Postsecondary Alignment
  • Stakeholder Engagement and Communication

 

Even though these resources are targeted for state CTE leaders, they are informative for all who are interested in knowing more about Perkins V.

 

Advance CTE also has a guide available, Key Tips for Engaging Policymakers, which provides advice on preparing to brief new leaders, with tailored guidance for and questions to expect from new governors, legislators, state board members, and K-12 and postsecondary leaders.

 

 

FY 2020 Administration Budget Request – The White House has just released its federal budget request for FY 2020.  For the third consecutive year, the administration’s budget request seeks to cut education spending. For FY 2020, a 12 percent cut for the U.S. Department of Education is recommended. Education Week is reporting that funding for teacher development under Title II, totaling $2.1 billion, would be eliminated, as would $1.2 billion in Title IV funding for academic supports and enrichment and $1.1 billion for 21st Century Community Learning Centers that support after-school programs. In total, funding for 29 programs would be eliminated in the federal budget. An early review suggests that the proposed CTE funding for FY 2020 is about the same as the actual appropriation for FY 2019 at about $1.3 billion.

 

Here’s the link to the FY 2020 budget request for the U.S. Department of Education.

 

Here's a link to a 4.5 minute video from the Alliance for Excellent Education that explains the impact of the Administration's budget request for the U.S. Department of Education.

 

Directly taken from Advance CTE's communications, some key programs of the Administration's budget request are highlighted below:

  • Investments in the Strengthening Career and Technical Education for the 21st Century Act (Perkins V):
    • CTE State Grants: proposed level funding for the Perkins Basic State Grants at the amount provided by Congress in FY19. The President's budget also includes the recommendation that Congress authorize changes to increase the fees collected for H-1B visas and redirect 15 percent of that revenue to provide an increase in funding for CTE State Grants. However, we are still examining this proposal and at this point, it is unclear if this would be a practical way to ensure more resources for CTE State Grants and how much funding could be realized.
    • National Programs: proposed increase of $12.58 million above the amount provided by Congress in FY19 to support the new Innovation and Modernization grants authorized under Perkins V.
  • Student Support and Academic Enrichment Grants, authorized under Title IV-A of the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA), which can support CTE as part of a well-rounded education: proposed for elimination.
  • Supporting Effective Instruction State Grants, authorized under Title II of ESSA, which can support CTE professional development: proposed for elimination.  
  • Pell Grants: proposed to keep the maximum Pell grant frozen at its current level, rescind $2 billion from the the Pell reserve (the unobligated funds for the program that have been previously appropriated), and expand the access to the Pell grant to short-term programs. Advance CTE is supportive of expanding Pell grants to shorter-term programs as outlined in the JOBS Act, which has bipartisan support.
  • State formula grants provided through Title I of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA): proposed level funding at the amount provided by Congress in FY19.
  • Adult Education and Family Literacy State Grants: proposed decrease of $156.2 million below the level provided by Congress in FY19.  
  • Apprenticeship grants: proposed level funding at the amount provided by Congress in FY19, noting that these funds should be directed to Industry-Recognized Apprenticeships.

 

 

2019 ACTE National Policy Seminar Agricultural Education Track – We are eager to welcome agricultural educators to the ACTE National Policy Seminar, March 24-27.  NAAE is paying the registration fee for an agricultural educator from 22 states to participate in the NPS.

This is a feature from the February 2019 edition of NAAE’s News & Views Newsletter. To read News & Views in its entirety, please visit this link.

 

The 2019 ACTE National Policy Seminar with Agricultural Education Track is just around the corner. We hope you are able to join us for three days of networking and learning about all of the different ways you can advocate for your program and your profession. 

 

To kick off this event and to help start thinking about the importance of advocacy, we want to know....

 

What does ADVOCACY look like to YOU? 

 

Share your thoughts with us!

This is a feature from the January 2019 edition of NAAE’s News & Views Newsletter. To read News & Views in its entirety, please visit this link.

 

The 116th United States Congress was sworn in on January 3. Aside from the work related to the partial federal government shutdown, we can report on the new committee membership for the House and Senate committees related to career and technical education.

 

Senate Appropriations Committee Chairman Shelby (R-AL) and Vice Chairman Leahy (D-VT) announced that Chairman Blunt (R-MO) and Ranking Member Murray (D-WA) will remain as the leaders of the Senate Appropriations Subcommittee on Labor, Health and Human Services, Education and Related Agencies.

 

The House Appropriations Committee leadership has shifted. The new Chairwoman of the Committee is Rep. Lowey (D-NY) and the new Ranking Member is Rep. Granger (R-TX). Rep. DeLauro (D-CT) will serve as the Chairwoman of the House Appropriations Subcommittee on Labor, Health and Human Services, Education and Related Agencies.


For the Senate HELP Committee, Sen. Alexander (R-TN) will remain the Chairman and Sen. Murray (D-WA) will remain the Ranking Member. However, the membership for the Committee shifted slightly. Sen. Young (R-IN) and Sen. Bennet (D-CO) will move off the Committee and Sen. Hatch (R-UT) retired in 2018. Sen. Romney (R-UT), Sen. Braun (R-IN) and Sen. Rosen (D-NV) will be joining the Committee.

 

The House Committee on Education and the Workforce is now renamed the House Committee on Education and Labor, as has been past practice when Democrats are in the majority in the House. Rep. Scott (D-VA) is serving as the Committee's Chairman and Rep. Foxx (R-NC) is serving as the Committee's Ranking Member.

 

ACTE National Policy Seminar with Agricultural Education Track – NPS is a bit later this year … March 25-27, 2019.  NAAE will pay the NPS registration fee for one representative from each of the state ag ed associations to participate in the NPS.  Details are here: https://www.naae.org/advocacy/nps.cfm.

This is a feature from the December 2018 edition of NAAE’s News & Views Newsletter. To read News & Views in its entirety, please visit this link.

 

How can it almost be 2019? Time sure flies when we are having fun in Ag Education! As we head into 2019, how do you plan to advocate for your ag program and for agricultural education in general?

 

We want to hear your ideas!

This is a feature from the November 2018 edition of NAAE’s News & Views Newsletter. To read News & Views in its entirety, please visit this link.

 

NAAE Convention is almost here! In just a couple of weeks our ag education family will convene in San Antonio for networking, professional development, business sessions, and so much more!

 

This month, we would like to know what kinds of advocacy resources would you like to have available from NAAE? Let us know your thoughts and hopefully we will be able to offer some great tools and resources to you!

This is a feature from the October 2018 edition of NAAE’s News & Views Newsletter. To read News & Views in its entirety, please visit this link.

 

National FFA Convention is just around the corner! Not only is this a great experience for your students to compete and learn, but it is also a fantastic time for you to network and gain resources you can take back to your program. 

 

This month's question is: How will you use National FFA Convention to advocate for your agriculture program and for agricultural education?

 

We want to hear your thoughts! Post your ideas below.

This is a feature from the September 2018 edition of NAAE’s News & Views Newsletter. To read News & Views in its entirety, please visit this link.

 

UPDATE -- 10-02-18

The Senate voted 93-7 on September 18 to advance an FY19 appropriations package that includes the Labor-HHS-Ed appropriations bill (which includes key investments in education and workforce programs). On September 26, the House voted to approve that package (361-61) and the President signed it on September 28. This bill includes a $70 million increase in the federal investment in Perkins Basic State Grants - check out the press statement from Advance CTE and the Association for Career and Technical Education (ACTE) to learn more. You can also find the bill's specific levels of investment in key U.S. Department of Education programs in  this table from the Committee for Education Funding (CEF) and in key U.S. Department of Labor programs in this table from National Skills Coalition.

In addition, this legislation included language from the conferees (the Members of Congress who served on a committee determine the final Labor-HHS-Ed FY19 bill) about the use of Perkins for National Activities, the importance of computer science education and the role of the Office of Career, Technical and Adult Education (OCTAE). First, it directs the U.S. Secretary of Education to award innovation and modernization grants through Perkins and notes that these funds could "support coding programs that can be particularly important in rural and underserved areas that do not have access to coding resources." The legislation also discusses computer science education more broadly, noting that "computer science education programs, including coding academies, can provide important benefits to local industries and the economy and help meet in-demand workforce needs. Therefore, the Departments of Labor and Education should work together with industry to improve and expand computer science education programs and opportunities, including through apprenticeships." Lastly, the legislation also affirms the value of OCTAE and notes the conferees' concerns about its elimination or consolidation in terms of achieving OCTAE's mission and implementation of programs. Importantly, it confirms that "OCTAE is authorized expressly in statute and cannot be consolidated or reorganized except by specific authority granted by Congress."

 

Fiscal Year 19 Perkins Appropriations -- Last week, a conference committee comprised of members of both the House and Senate was formed to negotiate the Fiscal Year 2019 (FY19) final appropriations bill for Labor, Health and Human Services, Education and Related Agencies (Labor-HHS-Education). The Senate passed their FY19 Labor, Health and Human Services, Education and Related Agencies appropriations bill on August 23. The Senate bill includes level funding at the amount provided in FY18 for the Perkins Basic State Grants. The House Appropriations Committee on Labor, Health and Human Services, Education and Related Agencies out of Committee over the summer, which included a $102 million increase above the amount provided in FY18 for Perkins Basic State Grants. Now, the conference committee will determine whether or not to include this increase in the final FY19 Labor-HHS-Education appropriations bill (along with resolving other differences between the two bills). Read below to learn more about how to contact your Member of Congress to support a $102 million increase for Perkins.

 

Now is the time to contact your Members of Congress using the CTE Action Center (provided by our partners at the Association for Career and Technical Education) or by phone through the Capitol Switchboard at 202-224-3121. Please let them know that a conference committee will soon consider the FY 2019 Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education appropriations bill and be sure to ask them to support a $102 million increase for the Perkins Basic State Grant program in this bill, as proposed by the House. It is particularly important to contact Members of Congress on the conference committee, who are listed below:

 

House: Rep. Rodney Frelinghuysen (R-NJ), Rep. Kay Granger (R-TX), Rep. Tom Cole (R-OK), Rep. Ken Calvert (R-CA), Rep. Steve Womack (R-AR), Rep. Robert Aderholt (R-AL), Rep. Harold Rogers (R-KY), Rep. Martha Roby (R-AL), Rep. Nita Lowey (D-NY), Rep. Peter Visclosky (D-IN), Rep. Rosa DeLauro (D-CT), Rep. Lucille Roybal-Allard (D-CA), Rep. Betty McCollum (D-MN)

Senate: Sen. Richard Shelby (R-AL), Sen. Roy Blunt (R-MO), Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-SC), Sen. Jerry Moran (R-KS), Sen. Patrick Leahy (D-VT), Sen. Patty Murray (D-WA), Sen. Dick Durbin (D-IL)

This is a feature from the August 2018 edition of NAAE’s News & Views Newsletter. To read News & Views in its entirety, please visit this link.

 

As we approach National Teach Ag Day on Thursday, September 20th, it is important that we make plans to not only celebrate the wonderful profession we are in, but to take time to promote agricultural education to our administrators, communities, and legislators. 

 

Our question to you is: How can you use National Teach Ag Day to advocate for your agriculture program?

 

Tell us your thoughts!

This is a feature from the July 2018 edition of NAAE’s News & Views Newsletter. To read News & Views in its entirety, please visit this link.

 

U.S. House Appropriations Committee Passes FY 19 Funding Bill that Includes Key Education Priorities -- On July 11, the House Appropriations Committee marked up and voted to pass the Labor, Health and Human Services, Education and Related Agencies FY19 appropriations bill. The bill largely retained the funding levels for education and workforce programs included in the bill that was passed by the House Appropriations Subcommittee on Labor, Health and Human Services, Education and Related Agencies and added $73 million for four education programs. The subcommittee bill included a $102 million increase for the Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Act (Perkins) Basic State Grant Program, a $13 million increase for National Activities under Perkins and increases for a couple of other key programs as well. The Senate Appropriations Committee passed their Labor, Health and Human Services, Education and Related Agencies FY19 Appropriations bill on June 28. This bill included level funding for Perkins at the amount provided in FY18. The FY19 appropriations process is still underway and differences between the two bills will need to be resolved to determine final allocations for Perkins for FY 2019.

This is a feature from the June 2018 edition of NAAE’s News & Views Newsletter. To read News & Views in its entirety, please visit this link.

 

As part of this month's edition of News & Views, we want to know what advocacy resources you would like to see added to Communities of Practice.

 

Let us know your thoughts!

This is a feature from the May 2018 edition of NAAE’s News & Views Newsletter. To read News & Views in its entirety, please visit this link

 

Scott Stump Nominated by President Trump as Assistant Secretary for Career, Technical, and Adult Education for the U.S. Department of Education – President Trump has nominated Scott Stump to be U. S. Department of Education Assistant Secretary for Career, Technical, and Adult Education. Stump currently serves as the Chief Operating and People Development Officer for Vivayic Inc., a firm specializing in learning services and knowledge transfer. Stump is the former Assistant Provost of Career and Technical Education at Colorado Community College System, leading Career Technical Education (CTE) in the state. Scott began his career as an agriculture teacher and was a staff person at the National FFA Organization. He was president of the National Association of State Directors of Career and Technical Education Consortium (currently Advance CTE) in 2014-15.  Stump's appointment requires United States Senate confirmation and it is uncertain when the U. S. Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor and Pensions will proceed with the confirmation hearing.

 

FY18 Omnibus Appropriations Bill Signed … Perkins Received $75 Million Increase – Congress has passed and President Trump has signed an omnibus appropriations bill for FY18 (the year ending September 30, 2018). Notably, the omnibus included a $75 million boost to the Perkins Basic State Grant, bringing this investment up to nearly $1.2 billion. This increase will be allocated to states based on the federal to state formula included in Title I of the Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Act of 2006 (Perkins). You can find more information about the omnibus in Advance CTE's press release and some notable increases (compared to FY17 levels) to education and workforce programs are outlined below:

  • Student Support and Academic Enrichment state grants, grants authorized under Title IV-A of the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) received a $700 million increase.
  • Congress authorized an increase in the maximum award for federal Pell Grants. Eligible students could receive up to $6,095 for the 2018-2019 academic year, compared to the current $5,920 per year.
  • State formula grants provided through Title I of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) were increased by $80 million.
  • Adult Education and Family Literacy State Grants were increased by $35 million.
  • Apprenticeship grants received a $50 million increase.

 

Perkins Reauthorization – Since House passage of H.R. 2353, the Strengthening Career and Technical Education for the 2st Century Act, the bill that would reauthorize Perkins, there has been little discussion about the Senate taking up reauthorization. Recently, Senate staff for members of the U.S. Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions (HELP) Committee have been engaged in internal discussions on Perkins reauthorization. Committee staff are exchanging ideas and language in an effort to spark discussion and move the reauthorization process forward. These initial ideas are not the foundation of a legislative proposal, but rather just one part of the negotiations. It remains to be seen when the Senate will take up Perkins reauthorization.

 

FY19 Appropriations – 170 members of the United States House of Representatives and 38 members of the United States Senate have signed letters to their respective House and Senate appropriations subcommittees requesting strong funding for Perkins programs.  These numbers reflect new record numbers of members of Congress who are on record requesting support for career and technical education programs.

This is a feature from the April 2018 edition of NAAE’s News & Views Newsletter. To read News & Views in its entirety, please visit this link.

 

As part of this month's edition of News & Views, we want to know how receiving an award, whether at the local, state, or national level, helps you to advocate for your agriculture program.

 

Let us know your thoughts!

This is an article from the March 2018 edition of NAAE’s News & Views Newsletter. To read News & Views in its entirety, please visit this link.

 

Perkins Reauthorization and Appropriations – Want to keep up with all things Perkins?  Check out this page (https://careertech.org/Perkins) on the website of Advance CTE, the professional association for state CTE leaders.  The ACTE website also has great Perkins advocacy resources here (https://www.acteonline.org/policy/).

 

There has been little new activity toward reauthorizing the Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Act.  In June 2017, the U. S. House of Representative passed their version of the Perkins reauthorization, H.R. 2353, the “Strengthening Career and Technical Education for the 21st Century Act.”  However, the U. S. Senate has taken no action to reauthorize Perkins.

 

The U. S. Congress has passed a series of continuing resolutions to fund the federal government, including federal education programs.  Funding for programs authorized under the Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Act has remained constant.  However, this paper from Advance CTE explains how CTE is chronically underfunded nationwide.

 

2018 ACTE National Policy Seminar with Ag Ed Track – The National Policy Seminar (NPS) was March 5-7 in the Washington, DC metro area. The agricultural education track of the NPS was well attended by participants from 24 states.  The ag ed track speakers included Mark Poeschl from the National FFA Organization, Dr. Steve Brown from the U. S. Department of Education who serves at the National FFA Advisor, Nancy Trivette who serves as the Ag Ed Division Vice President of ACTE, and Jay Jackman who is the NAAE Executive Director. Jason Kemp, NAAE President Elect, was the host and emcee for the ag ed track.  The National FFA Foundation and NAAE are the co-sponsors of the NPS ag ed track.

 

Advocacy Resources – The NAAE website hosts excellent advocacy resources (Advocacy | National Association of Agricultural Educators) that are available to assist you at the local, state, and federal levels.  Please take full advantage of every opportunity to advocate for high quality agricultural education in our public schools.

This is a feature from the February 2018 edition of NAAE’s News & Views Newsletter. To read News & Views in its entirety, please visit this link.

 

As part of this month's edition of News & Views, we want to know how you use the networks and resources available to you from the professional organizations you belong to, to advocate for your agriculture program and agricultural education.

 

Let us know your thoughts and ideas!

This is an article from the January 2018 edition of NAAE’s News & Views Newsletter. To read News & Views in its entirety, please visit this link.

 

Federal Funding -- The Fiscal Year (FY) 2018 budget and appropriations process began with the release of President Trump’s initial budget framework (known as a “skinny budget”) in March, with the full budget request following in May.  The Trump budget proposed drastic cuts in federal support for CTE, including a $168 million cut in the Perkins Basic State Grant.  While it also recommended an additional $20 million for the Perkins National Programs to establish a new competitive grant, that program would have only supported a small number of CTE programs in STEM fields.  Additionally, the budget request for the Department of Labor included a 40 percent reduction to adult, youth and dislocated worker state formula grants under the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act.  Both Education Secretary Betsy DeVos and Labor Secretary Alexander Acosta appeared before congressional committees to defend the Administration's budget plan where they received criticism from members of both parties over the proposed cuts.

This spring, lawmakers had an opportunity to sign letters in support of Perkins funding.  The effort was again led by Sen. Richard Blumenthal (D-CT), as well as Reps. Glenn Thompson (R-PA) and Jim Langevin (D-RI).  These letters received record support on Capitol Hill—140 members of the House of Representatives and 34 Senators championed federal funding for CTE in FY 2018.  Later in the year, the Appropriations Committees in both chambers approved funding bills that maintained the Perkins Basic State Grant at $1.118 billion.  However, Congress was unable to complete its appropriations work by the end of the fiscal year in September, which necessitated a stopgap continuing resolution (CR) to provide temporary funding for the federal government through December. This CR included an across-the-board cut to keep overall spending within the required budget caps for the year.  Because of the way Perkins funds are budgeted and dispersed, the cut impacted Perkins state grant advance funding that was disbursed on October 1.  The cut could be restored (and has routinely been in years past) if Congress approves a full-year funding bill.  However, congressional leaders and the Trump Administration opted to continue to punt on important funding decisions until at least January 19, leaving the cuts in place for the foreseeable future.

 

Perkins Reauthorization -- The 115th Congress brought with it a continued focus on Perkins reauthorization, as the House Education and the Workforce Committee picked up where it left off in 2016 with a hearing on Perkins in February.  ACTE Administration Division V.P. Janet Goble was invited to testify before the Early Childhood, Elementary, and Secondary Education Subcommittee.  Later in the spring, members of the committee reintroduced an updated version of the House Perkins reauthorization bill, this year identified as H.R. 2353.  The bill is very similar to the measure that passed the House in 2016, but made some tweaks to language around the state and secretarial roles, and made slight improvements to the application of the “CTE Concentrator” definition, the largest outstanding concern in the bill.  H.R. 2353 was marked up by the committee on May 17, and then passed unanimously by the full House in June.


The bill now awaits Senate action, which has been stalled for the last year due to disagreements over the issue of “secretarial authority” – how much authority the U.S. Department of Education should have over state CTE plans, performance and programs.

 

Looking Ahead to 2018 -- The second year of the Trump Administration is shaping up to be just as contentious as the first. Though the president and congressional Republicans celebrated the end of 2017 with the passage of a tax bill, the year was largely defined by legislative inaction.  With a deeply partisan Congress and a volatile White House buffeted by a steady stream of controversies, any effort to make progress on major policy issues, including infrastructure spending, immigration and health care reform, will likely be an uphill struggle in 2018.  Additionally, the mid-term elections in November will ensure that the latter part of the year is dominated by campaign politics.  Despite the strong potential for dysfunction in Washington, there are a number of outstanding education and workforce issues on the 2018 policy agenda.

Since Congress failed to pass a full-year appropriations bill last year, action will be needed on an FY 2018 funding bill in the coming days.  This effort will be further complicated by the start of the FY 2019 budget cycle, which will begin in earnest with the release of the Administration’s budget request in February.  Expect that President Trump will again seek deep cuts to domestic program, including education and workforce training.  However, it seems increasingly likely that a multi-year budget deal that includes an increase in the funding caps for both defense and non-defense funding can gain bipartisan support in Congress.  It’s a critical time to advocate for a strong federal investment in CTE.  Help us make 2018 matter by joining us in Washington on March 5-7, for ACTE’s National Policy Seminar!