Andrea Fristoe

Monday Morning Monitor -- 11/17/14

Blog Post created by Andrea Fristoe on Nov 17, 2014

 

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November 17, 2014

 

The National Council for Agricultural Education

Vision

To be the collective leadership voice for Agricultural Education in the United States.

Mission

The mission of The National Council for Agricultural Education is to establish high quality agricultural education programs in America’s schools by stimulating:

  • the preparation, retention, and advancement of high quality agricultural educators; the development of programs that prepare students for academic and career success;
  • program innovation and adaptability in response to changing student and industry needs;
  • the use of research-based practices in agricultural education programs at all levels; and
  • expanded opportunities for students to experience high quality educational programs in agriculture.

Upcoming Events


2014
November 18-22
NAAE Convention
Nashville, TN


2015
January 31-February 3
Southern Region AAAE Conference
Atlanta, GA


May 19-22
AAAE National Conference
San Antonio, TX


September 14-16
Western Region AAAE Conference
Corvallis, OR


October 1-3
North Central AAAE Conference
St. Paul, MN

Past Issues


November 10
November 3
October 27
October 20
October 13

Quote for the Week


"Coming together is a beginning; keeping together is progress; working together is success."
-Henry Ford


MMM Submissions

To have information from your ag ed organization included in the Monday Morning Monitor, email
Julie Fritsch , NAAE Communications/Marketing Coordinator.

The Council


Long Term Degrees, Certificates, and Credentials from Community Colleges Increase Employment and Earnings Opportunities; Short Term Certificates Do not return the Same Value   (from Us News & World Report & The Chronicle of Higher Education)
It turns out that getting a degree or certificate from a community college in most cases can significantly increase your future earnings, according to new research published in the journal Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis. Overall, students who received associate's degrees or long-term certificates – programs that take at least one year to complete – had a better chance of seeing increased wages, of being employed and of working more hours, which the researchers say is an indication of advancement in one's occupational trajectory. But short-term certificates – those that can be completed in under one year – resulted in small economic returns.


Short-term community-college certificates, which have been growing rapidly in popularity as a way to get students quickly and cheaply into jobs, do not, in fact, help most recipients land employment or earn more money, according to the study. The study is based on data from Washington state, but it reflects similar findings in three other states, according to researchers at the Community College Research Center at Columbia University's Teachers College and the Career Ladders Project, an initiative of the Board of Governors of the California Community Colleges. Some community-college leaders who reviewed a report on the study are challenging its conclusions. They insist that short-term certificates help students who can’t afford to pursue a college degree get back into the work force, and that even if the payoff isn’t immediately obvious, students benefit in the long run.


To read the full article from US News and World Report click here.
To read the full article from The Chronicle of Higher Education click here.
To read a full report on the study click here.


Why Farmers Aren't Cheering This Year's Monster Harvest (from National Public Radio)
U.S. farmers are bringing in what's expected to be a record-breaking harvest for both corn and soybeans. But for many farmers, that may be too much of a good thing. Farmers will haul in 4 billion bushels of soybeans and 14.5 billion bushels of corn, according to USDA estimates. The problem? Demand can't keep up with that monster harvest. Corn and soybean prices have been falling for months. A bushel of corn is now worth under $4 — about half what it was two years ago. That means a glut of corn and soybeans and the lowest prices in at least five years. To make matters worse, the oil boom in North Dakota is tying up the railways used to ship grain. Trains for things like coal or imports are also running behind.


To learn more and either listen to the story or read the full transcriptclick here.


Agriculture Workforce Demands Young Job Candidates, STEM Education (from FarmFutures)
A report from the STEM Food & Ag Council has found that there's a growing gap between the number of graduates in agriculture-related science, technology, engineering and math fields and the number of available employment opportunities. Released at the World Food Price Borlaug Dialogue last month, the report analyzes employment and enrollment in six fields: Agricultural business and management; Agriculture mechanization and engineering; Animal sciences; Plant and soil science; Food science and technology; and other life sciences.


Key findings indicated that from January to August 2014, the food and agriculture industries hired nearly 34,000 people per month. Additionally, a quarter of current food and agriculture professionals are age 55 or older, meaning workforce attrition will create additional opportunities for young professionals to advance in their careers. The report also found 4.9% aggregate growth in STEM employment opportunities in advanced agriculture fields is projected over the next five years, adding 33,100 new positions.


To read the full article from FarmFutures click here.
To access the 2014 STEM Food & Ag Council Report click here.


U.S.D.A. Approves Modified Potato (from The New York Times)
A potato genetically engineered to reduce the amounts of a potentially harmful ingredient in French fries and potato chips has been approved for commercial planting by the Department of Agriculture. The potato’s DNA has been altered so that less of a chemical called acrylamide, which is suspected of causing cancer in people, is produced when the potato is fried. The new potato also resists bruising, a characteristic long sought by potato growers and processors for financial reasons. Potatoes bruised during harvesting, shipping or storage can lose value or become unusable.


The biotech tubers were developed by the J. R. Simplot Company, a privately held company based in Boise, Idaho, which was the initial supplier of frozen French fries to McDonald’s in the 1960s and is still a major supplier. To read the full article click here.

NAAE


NAAE Convention
Convention officially begins tomorrow! Be sure to participate in the awesome professional development opportunities available to you.


Check out our new NAAE Convention scheduler! Now you can create your own customized schedule, print it and sync it with your mobile device!


Don't forget to register for the Host State Social -- "Tonkin Time in Tennessee." It's sure to be a great time at the Nashville Palace (easy walking distance from the hotel) with live music, line dancing, and an all-you-can-eat barbecue buffet. The cost is $35 per person. Click here for more information and to register TODAY to lock in your spot.


Also, grab a $50 honorarium for participating in the National Geographic Learning|Cengage Learning Focus Group. Click here for details.


The 2015-16 Secure Optimal Yield (SOY) Scholarship
The SOY Scholarship is a $5,000 one-time scholarship award presented to a high school senior who is going to pursue agriculture as an area of study at any accredited college or university. The scholarship is managed by the American Soybean Association and is made possible through a grant by BASF corporation.
Candidates may apply online Sept. 20 through Nov. 20, 2014.  Final selection will be made the first week of December during the ASA Board meeting. The student will be notified prior to an official announcement made during Commodity Classic in Phoenix on Feb. 27, 2015.For more information and to apply click here.


Apply for a NAAE Internship
We are offering summer internships in communications, professional development and advocacy. Applications are due December 19. Click here to apply.


Apply for the Teach Ag Internship
The National Teach Ag Campaign is now accepting applications for a 2015-2016 Teach Ag intern. Selected applicants will be based out of Lexington, Ky for the summer and based upon their performance, may be offered the position from their degree institution for the remainder of the position.  Therefore, all interested individuals are encouraged to apply not just those in the Kentucky area. Applications are due December 19th. Click here for more information and to apply.


National Agriscience Teacher Ambassador Academy
Applications are now being accepted for the 2015 National Agriscience Teacher Ambassador Academies. NATAA is a multifaceted program that includes a week-long academy designed to help participants develop inquiry-based teaching strategies and enhance existing science content in agricultural education. Two academies will be held in 2015. The deadline for applications is December 21, 2014. Follow this link for complete details.


Community of Practice Highlights

ACTE


US Labor Secretary Perez to Speak at ACTE's CareerTech VISION 2014's Awards Banquet
Wednesday, November 19, 7:00pm-9:00pm
The Gaylord Convention Center, Nashville
To honor award-winning career and technical eduation leaders across the country, US Secretary of Labor Thomas E. Perez will deliver keynote remarks at ACTE's CareerTech VISION 2014's Awards Banquet to discuss the importance of CTE providing students with the spectrum of skills essential to be work-ready in today's global economy. The Awards Banquet features recipients of the ACTE Excellence Awards and an elegant three-course dinner.
Click here to purchase tickets.

FFA Alumni


Have you heard about the FFA Alumni Affiliation Program?
It is up and running! Get your FFA Alumni Affiliate signed up by sending your Affiliation Agreement Form signed and submitted to your state alumni membership contact. For $100 plus state dues, your FFA Alumni can have as many FFA Alumni members as they want for the year. Click here for more information on the program. Then click hereto go straight to the form to sign up.

FFA


Excellence in Action Award
The Excellence in Action award recognizes superior Career and Technical Education pgrograms of study from around the nation. Selected programs of study exemplify excellence in the implementation of the Career Clusters, and have a meaningful impact on student achievement and success. Award recipients will be honored at an awards ceremony on April 8, 2015 in Washington, D.C., featured in our communications, marketing and advocacy materials, and used during Congressional visits, with members of the media and other CTE stakeholders to support a more positive image of CTE. All applications are due by 5:00 ET on Tuesday, December 3, 2014. Click here for more information and to apply.


The 2015 National FFA Scholarship Application is Now Live
Application deadlines for 2015:

  • The online application must be submitted prior to 5 p.m. EST on Feb. 1, 2015
  • The required Signature Pages must be mailed postmarked no later than Feb. 8, 2015
  • Same as last year:
    Membership must be submitted by state to national by March 1, 2015

Instructions, details and helpful tools are available onwww.FFA.org/scholarships.  Be sure to review eligibility requirements for the America’s Farmers Grow Ag Leaders scholarships presented by the Monsanto Fund and the Built Ford Tough dealer scholarship program.

Direct questions, comments or concerns via email toScholarships@FFA.org.

$2,500 Hunger Grants from National FFA – Still Time To Apply!
Vista FFA (CA) raised pigs, lambs and other animals to donate fresh meat to the school backpack program with an FFA: Food For All grant. What would your chapter do with $2,500 to help fight hunger? The application and resources are available at www.FFA.org/foodforall. Grants are due Wednesday, Nov. 26th.

CAST

Friday, November 14, 2014: Trade talks and Washington politics affect agriculture, GMO research continues to come in, and a corn maze becomes a “field of no exit”—these stories plus the usual news links, opinions, student happenings, and oddities.

The Council for Agricultural Science and Technology's (CAST)weekly online newsletter, Friday Notes, is available free due to a grant from WinField (a Land O’Lakes company).

 

 

 

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